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THUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRA

THUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRATHUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRA
A Book for All and None

By Friedrich Nietzsche
Read by Christopher Oxford
11 hours 56 minutes

Christopher Oxford headshot

 

 

 

 

 

Thus Spoke Zarathustra is one of the most extraordinary – and important – texts in Western philosophy. It was written by Friedrich Nietzsche between 1883 and 1885. He cast it in the form of a novel in the hope that his urgent message of the ‘death of God’ and the rise of the superman (übermensch) would have greater emotional as well as intellectual impact. Though tarnished somewhat by inappropriate adoption by the Nazi movement in the mid-20th century, Zarathustra remains an immensely important and influential work, particularly as it exhorts the individual to question standard conventions of society, in order to pursue a truly ethical and spiritual path. After ten years in solitude in the mountains, Zarathustra decides it is time to return to the world so that people could benefit from the fruits of his pondering: ‘ I would like to bestow and distribute, until the wise have once more become joyous in their folly, and the poor happy in their riches.’Thus Spoke Zarathustra is a challenging text, but once encountered, and absorbed, cannot be forgotten both for its content and style.Translation: Thomas Common – revised and updated

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Available on audible: audible.co.ukaudible.comaudible.deaudible.fraudible.com.au£21.25 or subscription.

 

READ REVIEWS

“Best Narration of this book thus far!”

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes, if you’ve ever wondered if the prose of this book could ever been properly and well delivered. Then this is it! Christopher Oxford gives maximum effort and does a magnificent job of really paying attention to the text and appears to fully appreciate and understand it. This culminates in a listening experience that is enjoyable and helps get across some of the nuances of the text. I don’t believe this has been as well as this before. If you want to hear this book with a different perspective on delivery – then look no further and get this version without hesitation!

– Audible Review

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TIME AND FREE WILL

TIME AND FREE WILL

An Essay on the Immediate Data of Consciousness

By Henri Bergson
Read by Michael Lunts
6 hours 44 minutes

Henri Bergson (1859 – 1941) was the leading French philosopher of the first half of the twentieth century. Near the end of his life when he was forced to register with the police in Nazi occupied France he wrote: ‘Academic. Philosopher. Nobel prize winner. Jew.’ Continue Reading →

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA

By Geoffrey Chaucer
Read by Jonathan Keeble
7 hours 43 minutes

Considered one of Chaucer’s finest poems, second only to The Canterbury Tales in richness and depth, Troilus and Cressida is a tragic love story set against the background of the siege of Troy by the Greeks. Written in the 1380s, it presents Troilus, son of Priam and younger brother of Hector as a Trojan warrior of renown who sees, and falls deeply in love with the beautiful Cressida. Continue Reading →

TWILIGHT OF THE IDOLS TRUTH AND LIES IN THE NONMORAL SENSE

TWILIGHT OF THE IDOLS

TRUTH AND LIES IN THE NONMORAL SENSE

By Friedrich Nietzsche
Read by Michael Lunts
4 hours 22 minutes

Though ‘Twilight of the Idols’ (written in a week in 1888 and subtitled ‘How to Philosophize with a Hammer’) came near the end of Nietzsche’s creative life he actually recommended it as a starting point for the study of his work. This was because from the beginning he viewed it as an introduction to his wide-ranging views. After an opening chapter of aphorisms – ‘Maxims and Arrows’ – he takes a challenging look at ‘The Problem of Socrates’, continues to buck the trend with ‘Morality as Anti-Nature’, and ‘The Four Great Errors’ (starting with ‘The Error of Confusing Cause and Effect’). He makes a scathing attack on conventional morality in ‘The Improvers of Mankind’, and finishes with a critical look at his own nation in ‘What Germans Lack’. Continue Reading →

TWO FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEMS OF ETHICS ESSAY ON THE FREEDOM OF THE WILL / THE BASIS OF MORALITY

TWO FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEMS OF ETHICS ESSAY ON THE FREEDOM OF THE WILL / THE BASIS OF MORALITY

By Arthur Schopenhauer
Read by Leighton Pugh
20 hours 38 minutes

The essays in ‘The Two Fundamental Problems of Ethics’ have a rather special place in Schopenhauer’s work, both being written as entries to Scandinavian philosophy competitions, one in Norway and the other in Sweden. ‘Essay on the Freedom of the Will’ was Schopenhauer’s response to the question posed by the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences in 1839: ‘Is it possible to demonstrate human free will from self-consciousness’. Continue Reading →

TWO TREATISES OF GOVERNMENT A LETTER CONCERNING TOLERATION

TWO TREATISES OF GOVERNMENT

A LETTER CONCERNING TOLERATION

By John Locke
Read by Leighton Pugh
12 hours 50 minutes

John Locke (1632-1704) was a product of his troubled times: he lived through the English Civil War, the Interregnum, the Restoration, Monmouth’s Rebellion, the Bloody Assizes and the Glorious Revolution. His empirical thinking was very much directed at finding rational solutions to the root causes of those troubles. Considered the founder of English empiricism and a precursor of the enlightenment his ideas on religious toleration, human rights and limitations on governmental power may seem so normal to us now as to be common sense, so well have they been assimilated by the social psyche; but this was far from being the case when Locke proposed them. Continue Reading →

UNTIMELY CONSIDERATIONS

UNTIMELY CONSIDERATIONS

By Friedrich Nietzsche
Read by Michael Lunts
• 12 hours 57 minutes

Michael Lunts

Untimely Considerations contain four essays: David Strauss – Writer and Confessor; On the Use and Abuse of History for Life; Schopenhauer as Educator; and Richard Wagner at Bayreuth. Continue Reading →

UTILITARIANISM • ON LIBERTY

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UTILITARIANISM • ON LIBERTY

By John Stuart Mill
Read by Derek Le Page
8 hours 49 minutes

derek-le-page

John Stuart Mill (1808-1873) was a torch-bearer for liberal thought in the 19th century: liberty of the individual, freedom of speech, a champion for women’s suffrage in Parliament. A remarkable man – he learnt Greek aged three, and by eight had read Herodotus, Xenophon and Plato – he campaigned all his life for a just society. Continue Reading →

WATT

 Watt

By Samuel Beckett
Read by Dermot Crowley
10 hours 5 minutes

Written in Roussillon during World War Two, while Samuel Beckett was hiding from the Gestapo, Watt was first published in 1953. Beckett acknowledged that this comic novel unlike any other ‘has its place in the series’ – those masterpieces running from Murphy to the Trilogy, Waiting for Godot and beyond. It shares their sense of a world in crisis, their profound awareness of the paradoxes of being, and their distrust of the rational universe.  Continue Reading →

WILHELM MEISTER’S APPRENTICESHIP

WILHELM MEISTER’S APPRENTICESHIP

By Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Read by Leighton Pugh
22 hours 57 minutes

Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship – Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre was the original German title – was Goethe’s second novel, published 1795-6, almost two decades after The Sorrows of Young Werther. It again focuses on a young man, but this time on his growing understanding and maturity as he makes his way in the world. Continue Reading →