Archive | Catalogue

THE THEORY OF MORAL SENTIMENTS

THE THEORY OF MORAL SENTIMENTS

By Adam SMITH
Read by Michael Lunts
16 hours 28 minutes

Michael Lunts

‘How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it.’ So begins  The Theory of Moral Sentiments, (1759) the first major text by Adam Smith who, seven years later, was to publish what was to become one of the major economic classics, The Wealth of Nations (1776). Continue Reading →

THE THIRTEEN PRINCIPAL UPANISHADS

THE THIRTEEN PRINCIPAL UPANISHADS

By Anonymous
Read by SAGAR ARYA
11 hours 11 minutes

The Upanishads are mankind’s oldest works of philosophy, predating the earliest Greek philosophy. They are the concluding part of the Vedas, the ancient Indian sacred literature, and mark the culmination of a tradition of speculative thought first expressed in the Rig-Veda more than 4000 years ago. Continue Reading →

THE UNDISCOVERED SELF

THE UNDISCOVERED SELF

By C.G Jung
Read by David Rintoul
2 hours 30 minutes

 David Rintoul

In The Undiscovered Self Jung explains the essence of his teaching for a readership unfamiliar with his ideas. He highlights the importance of individual responsibility and freedom in the context of today’s mass society, and argues that individuals must organize themselves as effectively as the organized mass if they are to resist joining it. Continue Reading →

THE WEALTH OF NATIONS

THE WEALTH OF NATIONS

By Adam SMITH
Read by Michael Lunts
16 hours 28 minutes

Michael Lunts

The Wealth of Nations, first published in 1776, is the first book of modern political economy and still provides the foundation for the study of that discipline. An Enquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, to give it is full title, it was an immediate bestseller, and has since rightfully claimed its place in the Western intellectual canon. Its author, Adam Smith (1723-1790), was one of the brightest stars of the 18th century Scottish Enlightenment. Continue Reading →

THE WILL TO POWER

THE WILL TO POWER

By Friedrich Nietzsche
Read by Michael Lunts
23 hours 23 minutes

Nietzsche never recovered from his breakdown in 1889 and therefore was unable to further any plans he had for the ‘magnum opus’ he had once intended, bringing together in a coherent whole his mature philosophy. Continue Reading →

THE WISDOM OF LIFE, COUNSELS AND MAXIMS

the-wisdom-of-life-counsels-and-maxims_newTHE WISDOM OF LIFE, COUNSELS AND MAXIMS

By Arthur Schopenhauer
Read by David Rintoul
9 hours 22 minutes

 David Rintoul

‘The two foes of human happiness are pain and boredom.’

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) was one of the most influential philosophers of the 19th century because his humanistic, atheistic if pessimistic views chimed with a new secularism that was emerging from a Western society dominated by religion. Despite his rather forbidding image, (and a few outdated views) he is one of the most approachable of German philosophers and this is certainly evident in these two key works, The Wisdom of Life and Counsels and Maxims. Continue Reading →

THE WORLD AS WILL AND IDEA Volume 1

THE WORLD AS WILL AND IDEA Volume 1

By Arthur Schopenhauer
Read by Leighton Pugh
20 hours 31 minutes

Schopenhauer was just 30 when his magnum opus, Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung, a work of considerable learning and innovation of thought, first appeared in 1818. Much to his chagrin and puzzlement, (so convinced was he of its merits) it didn’t have an immediate effect on European philosophy, views and culture. Continue Reading →

THE WORLD AS WILL AND IDEA VOLUME 2

THE WORLD AS WILL AND IDEA Volume 2

By Arthur Schopenhauer
Read by Leighton Pugh
17 hours 51 minutes

The original edition of The World as Will and Idea appeared in 1818 but in 1844 Schopenhauer published an expanded version. It contained the Criticism of the Kantian Philosophy, a lengthy document; and Supplements to the First Book (The Doctrine of the Idea of Perception) and the Second Book (The Doctrine of Perception or Knowledge Of The Understanding). Continue Reading →

THE WORLD AS WILL AND IDEA Volume 3

THE WORLD AS WILL AND IDEA Volume 3

By Arthur Schopenhauer
Read by Leighton Pugh
17 hours 22 minutes

In this final part to Schopenhauer’s momentous and hugely influential work, his original and wide-ranging observations are as lively as ever. Though cast as a ‘pessimist’ by history, he is anything but that to read – and listen to. Here are the last supplementary comments his original work (published 1818), the fruit of decades of further reflection. Continue Reading →

THE WORLD OF YESTERDAY

THE WORLD OF YESTERDAY

By Stefan Zweig
Read by David Horovitch
17 hours 50 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

Stefan Zweig’s memoir The World of Yesterday, recalls the golden age of pre-war Europe – its seeming permanence, its promise and its devastating fall with the onset of two world wars. Zweig’s passionate, evocative prose paints a stunning portrait of an era that danced brilliantly on the brink of extinction. Continue Reading →

THREE DIALOGUES BETWEEN HYLAS AND PHILONOUS

THREE DIALOGUES BETWEEN HYLAS AND PHILONOUS

By George Berkeley
Read by Jonathan Keeble and Peter Kenny
3 hours 49 minutes

Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous in Opposition to Sceptics and Atheists was the final statement by the empiricist philosopher George Berkeley, Bishop of Coyne, (1685-1753) on his views concerning subjective idealism, couched in the famous statement ‘esse is percipi’ – to be is to be perceived (mixing Latin with a bit of English was Berkeley’s idiosyncracy!). Continue Reading →

THREE ESSAYS ON THE THEORY OF SEXUALITY, BEYOND THE PLEASURE PRINCIPLE, THE EGO AND THE ID

THREE ESSAYS ON THE THEORY OF SEXUALITY, BEYOND THE PLEASURE PRINCIPLE, THE EGO AND THE ID

By Sigmund Freud
Read by Derek Le Page
8 hours 52 minutes

Here are three key works by Sigmund Freud which, published in the first decades of the 20th century, underpinned his developing views and had such a dramatic effect on world society. In the uncompromising Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905) he declared that ‘sexual aberrations’ are not limited to the insane but exist in ‘normal’ people to a greater or lesser degree. Continue Reading →

THUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRA

THUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRATHUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRA
A Book for All and None

By Friedrich Nietzsche
Read by Christopher Oxford
11 hours 56 minutes

Christopher Oxford headshot

 

 

 

 

 

Thus Spoke Zarathustra is one of the most extraordinary – and important – texts in Western philosophy. It was written by Friedrich Nietzsche between 1883 and 1885. He cast it in the form of a novel in the hope that his urgent message of the ‘death of God’ and the rise of the superman (übermensch) would have greater emotional as well as intellectual impact. Though tarnished somewhat by inappropriate adoption by the Nazi movement in the mid-20th century, Zarathustra remains an immensely important and influential work, particularly as it exhorts the individual to question standard conventions of society, in order to pursue a truly ethical and spiritual path. After ten years in solitude in the mountains, Zarathustra decides it is time to return to the world so that people could benefit from the fruits of his pondering: ‘ I would like to bestow and distribute, until the wise have once more become joyous in their folly, and the poor happy in their riches.’Thus Spoke Zarathustra is a challenging text, but once encountered, and absorbed, cannot be forgotten both for its content and style.Translation: Thomas Common – revised and updated

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Available on audible: audible.co.ukaudible.comaudible.deaudible.fraudible.com.au£21.25 or subscription.

 

READ REVIEWS

“Best Narration of this book thus far!”

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes, if you’ve ever wondered if the prose of this book could ever been properly and well delivered. Then this is it! Christopher Oxford gives maximum effort and does a magnificent job of really paying attention to the text and appears to fully appreciate and understand it. This culminates in a listening experience that is enjoyable and helps get across some of the nuances of the text. I don’t believe this has been as well as this before. If you want to hear this book with a different perspective on delivery – then look no further and get this version without hesitation!

– Audible Review

Continue Reading →

TIME AND FREE WILL

TIME AND FREE WILL

An Essay on the Immediate Data of Consciousness

By Henri Bergson
Read by Michael Lunts
6 hours 44 minutes

Henri Bergson (1859 – 1941) was the leading French philosopher of the first half of the twentieth century. Near the end of his life when he was forced to register with the police in Nazi occupied France he wrote: ‘Academic. Philosopher. Nobel prize winner. Jew.’ Continue Reading →

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA

By Geoffrey Chaucer
Read by Jonathan Keeble
7 hours 43 minutes

Considered one of Chaucer’s finest poems, second only to The Canterbury Tales in richness and depth, Troilus and Cressida is a tragic love story set against the background of the siege of Troy by the Greeks. Written in the 1380s, it presents Troilus, son of Priam and younger brother of Hector as a Trojan warrior of renown who sees, and falls deeply in love with the beautiful Cressida. Continue Reading →

TWILIGHT OF THE IDOLS TRUTH AND LIES IN THE NONMORAL SENSE

TWILIGHT OF THE IDOLS

TRUTH AND LIES IN THE NONMORAL SENSE

By Friedrich Nietzsche
Read by Michael Lunts
4 hours 22 minutes

Though ‘Twilight of the Idols’ (written in a week in 1888 and subtitled ‘How to Philosophize with a Hammer’) came near the end of Nietzsche’s creative life he actually recommended it as a starting point for the study of his work. This was because from the beginning he viewed it as an introduction to his wide-ranging views. After an opening chapter of aphorisms – ‘Maxims and Arrows’ – he takes a challenging look at ‘The Problem of Socrates’, continues to buck the trend with ‘Morality as Anti-Nature’, and ‘The Four Great Errors’ (starting with ‘The Error of Confusing Cause and Effect’). He makes a scathing attack on conventional morality in ‘The Improvers of Mankind’, and finishes with a critical look at his own nation in ‘What Germans Lack’. Continue Reading →

TWO FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEMS OF ETHICS ESSAY ON THE FREEDOM OF THE WILL / THE BASIS OF MORALITY

TWO FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEMS OF ETHICS ESSAY ON THE FREEDOM OF THE WILL / THE BASIS OF MORALITY

By Arthur Schopenhauer
Read by Leighton Pugh
20 hours 38 minutes

The essays in ‘The Two Fundamental Problems of Ethics’ have a rather special place in Schopenhauer’s work, both being written as entries to Scandinavian philosophy competitions, one in Norway and the other in Sweden. ‘Essay on the Freedom of the Will’ was Schopenhauer’s response to the question posed by the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences in 1839: ‘Is it possible to demonstrate human free will from self-consciousness’. Continue Reading →

TWO TREATISES OF GOVERNMENT A LETTER CONCERNING TOLERATION

TWO TREATISES OF GOVERNMENT

A LETTER CONCERNING TOLERATION

By John Locke
Read by Leighton Pugh
12 hours 50 minutes

John Locke (1632-1704) was a product of his troubled times: he lived through the English Civil War, the Interregnum, the Restoration, Monmouth’s Rebellion, the Bloody Assizes and the Glorious Revolution. His empirical thinking was very much directed at finding rational solutions to the root causes of those troubles. Considered the founder of English empiricism and a precursor of the enlightenment his ideas on religious toleration, human rights and limitations on governmental power may seem so normal to us now as to be common sense, so well have they been assimilated by the social psyche; but this was far from being the case when Locke proposed them. Continue Reading →

UNTIMELY CONSIDERATIONS

UNTIMELY CONSIDERATIONS

By Friedrich Nietzsche
Read by Michael Lunts
• 12 hours 57 minutes

Michael Lunts

Untimely Considerations contain four essays: David Strauss – Writer and Confessor; On the Use and Abuse of History for Life; Schopenhauer as Educator; and Richard Wagner at Bayreuth. Continue Reading →

UTILITARIANISM • ON LIBERTY

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UTILITARIANISM • ON LIBERTY

By John Stuart Mill
Read by Derek Le Page
8 hours 49 minutes

derek-le-page

John Stuart Mill (1808-1873) was a torch-bearer for liberal thought in the 19th century: liberty of the individual, freedom of speech, a champion for women’s suffrage in Parliament. A remarkable man – he learnt Greek aged three, and by eight had read Herodotus, Xenophon and Plato – he campaigned all his life for a just society. Continue Reading →