Archive | Catalogue

THE PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF EVERYDAY LIFE

THE PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF EVERYDAY LIFE

By Sigmund Freud
Read by Derek Le Page
8 hours 6 minutes

The Psychopathology of Everyday Life, which appeared first in 1901 and was then expanded in a series of subsequent editions, has proved to be one of Freud’s most popular works, and one of his most influential during his lifetime. It was here that he proposed that many slips and errors of memory common to the average man in everyday life actually signals unconscious issues that beset the individual, and, if examined, can be extremely revealing. Continue Reading →

THE PRAISE OF FOLLY / AGAINST WAR

THE PRAISE OF FOLLY / AGAINST WAR

By Desiderius Erasmus
Read by Georgina Sutton, Leighton Pugh
6 hours

Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam (1466-1536) was known as Prince of the Humanists – though a theologian, a Catholic priest and the leading European scholar of his time. A close friend of Sir Thomas More, Erasmus’s writings had a strong influence on the growing movement for change in Christian Europe, both Lutheran and the Counter-Reformation. Continue Reading →

UTILITARIANISM • ON LIBERTY

utilitarianism-%e2%80%a2-on-liberty

UTILITARIANISM • ON LIBERTY

By John Stuart Mill
Read by Derek Le Page
8 hours 49 minutes

derek-le-page

John Stuart Mill (1808-1873) was a torch-bearer for liberal thought in the 19th century: liberty of the individual, freedom of speech, a champion for women’s suffrage in Parliament. A remarkable man – he learnt Greek aged three, and by eight had read Herodotus, Xenophon and Plato – he campaigned all his life for a just society. Continue Reading →

THE LETTERS OF PLINY THE YOUNGER

the-letters-of-pliny-the-youngerTHE LETTERS OF PLINY THE YOUNGER

By Pliny the Younger
Read by Leighton Pugh
12 hours 40 minutes

Leighton Pugh

Pliny the Younger (61 CE -c113 CE) was a well-connected official in the Rome of the 1st century, and it is through his ten Books of letters that we have one of the liveliest and most informal pictures of the period. As a lawyer and magistrate he rose through the senate to become consul in 100 AD, and therefore corresponded with leading figures including the historian Tacitus, the biographer Suetonius, the philosophers Artemidorus and Euphrates the Stoic and most notably the Emperor Trajan. Continue Reading →

LAND OF MEN

land-of-menLAND OF MEN (Wind Sand and Stars)

By Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Read by Nicholas Boulton
5 hours 18 minutes

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Antoine de Saint-Exupéry is known universally for the gentle charm of Le Petit Prince, but it is this book, Land of Men – known originally in English as Wind, Sand and Stars – which is his masterpiece. First published in 1939, it documents Saint-Exupéry’s life as a pilot in the pioneering days of long-distance flying and in particular his experiences as a pilot transporting mail across countries, across continents. Continue Reading →

AGRICOLA, GERMANIA, A DIALOGUE CONCERNING ORATORY

agricola-germania-a-dialogue-concerning-oratory
AGRICOLA, GERMANIA, A DIALOGUE CONCERNING ORATORY

By Tacitus
Read by Leighton Pugh
4 hours 49 minutes

Leighton Pugh

These three vibrant texts show different sides of the Roman historian Tacitus (c56–c102 CE) best known for his principal (and much longer) legacies of  The Annals and The Histories. Agricola was a successful general and Governor of Britain (77-83CE), a task which he carried out with firmness and probity – in contrast to much of the corruption and repression in place during the reign of Emperor Domitian. Continue Reading →

An Introduction to Schopenhauer’s The Wisdom of Life

the-wisdom-of-life-counsels-and-maximsAn Introduction to Schopenhauer’s The Wisdom of Life

By T. Bailey Saunders
Read by David Rintoul
42 minutes

 David Rintoul

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) was a key influence on a wide range of major 19th and 20th century figures who followed him  including Nietzsche, Schrödinger, Freud, Tolstoy, Wagner, Einstein, Thomas Mann, Jorge Luis Borges and Samuel Beckett. This was despite his reputation for being gloomy and pessimistic! Continue Reading →

THE WISDOM OF LIFE, COUNSELS AND MAXIMS

the-wisdom-of-life-counsels-and-maxims_newTHE WISDOM OF LIFE, COUNSELS AND MAXIMS

By Arthur Schopenhauer
Read by David Rintoul
9 hours 22 minutes

 David Rintoul

‘The two foes of human happiness are pain and boredom.’

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) was one of the most influential philosophers of the 19th century because his humanistic, atheistic if pessimistic views chimed with a new secularism that was emerging from a Western society dominated by religion. Despite his rather forbidding image, (and a few outdated views) he is one of the most approachable of German philosophers and this is certainly evident in these two key works, The Wisdom of Life and Counsels and Maxims. Continue Reading →

THE CONSOLATION OF PHILOSOPHY

the-consolation-of-philosophyTHE CONSOLATION OF PHILOSOPHY

By Anicius Manlius Severinus BOETHIUS
Read by David Rintoul
4 hours 55 minutes

 David Rintoul

The Consolation of Philosophy is one of the key works in the rich tradition of Western philosophy, partly because of the circumstances in which it was written. Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius (c480-c524) was of aristocratic Roman birth and became consul and then Master of Offices at Ravenna, one of the highest posts under the Ostrogothic Roman ruler Theodoric. But Boethius was unjustly charged with treason in 524 and this led to house arrest, then torture and execution. Continue Reading →

BUDDENBROOKS

buddenbrooks

BUDDENBROOKS

By Thomas Mann
Read by David Rintoul
26 hours 48 minutes

 David Rintoul

First published in 1900, when Thomas Mann was 25, Buddenbrooks is a minutely imagined chronicle of four generations of a North German mercantile family – a work so true to life that it scandalized the author’s former neighbours in his native Lübeck. Continue Reading →

MURPHY

murphyMURPHY

By Samuel Beckett
Read by Stephen Hogan
6 hours 51 minutes

 

‘The sun shone, having no alternative, on the nothing new.’ So opens Murphy, Samuel Beckett’s first novel, published in 1938. Its work-shy eponymous hero, adrift in London, realises that desire can never be satisfied and withdraws from life, in search of stupor. Continue Reading →

LE GRAND MEAULNES

LE GRAND MEAULNESLE GRAND MEAULNES (The Wanderer)

By Alain-Fournier
Read by John Hollingworth
6 hours 57 minutes

John Hollingworth

He says little about his adventure on his return. But François eventually discovers that Meaulnes stumbled upon a strange party held at an unknown chateau, and became enmeshed in the lives of the beautiful young Yvonne de Galais and her brother Frantz. Continue Reading →

THE SORRROWS OF YOUNG WERTHER

THE SORRROWS OF YOUNG WERTHERTHE SORRROWS OF YOUNG WERTHER

By Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Read by Leighton Pugh
4 hours 32 minutes

Werther, a sensitive young artist, finds himself in Wahlheim, a quiet attractive village in Germany where he seeks solace from the turmoils of love. It is a ‘young spring’ and he hopes that arcadian solitude will prove ‘a genial balm’ to his mind. But his romantic tendency rules otherwise, and he falls in love with Charlotte – Lotte – even though he knows she is affianced to another. Continue Reading →

A GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOANALYSIS

physcoanlysisA GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOANALYSIS

By Sigmund Freud
Read by Nigel Carrington
17 hours 36 minutes

This series of 28 lectures was given by Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the founder of psychoanalysis, during the First World War, and first published in English in 1920. The purpose of this ‘General Introduction’ was to present his work and ideas – as they had matured at that point – to a general public; and even though there was to be considerable development and change over the ensuing years, these talks still offer a valuable and remarkably approachable entry point to his revolutionary concepts. Continue Reading →

THE ENCHIRIDION & DISCOURSES

THE ENCHIRIDION & DISCOURSESTHE ENCHIRIDION & DISCOURSES

By Epictetus
Read by Hayward B. Morse
13 hours 16 minutes

Hayward B. Morse

The Enchiridion is the famous manual of ethical advice given in the 2nd century by the Stoic philosopher, Epictetus. Born to a Greek slave, Epictetus grew up in the environment of the Roman Empire and, having been released from bonds of slavery, became a stoic in the tradition of its originator Zeno (3rd Century BCE) and Seneca (1st century CE). Continue Reading →

THE GOLDEN ASS

THE GOLDEN ASSTHE GOLDEN ASS Or Metamorphoses

By Apuleius
Read by Jonathan Keeble
9 hours 50 minutes

Jonathan Keeble 1

This tale of a man who, when tinkering with magic, becomes changed into an ass is one of the most entertaining and remarkable stories from classic Latin literature. It is funny, bawdy, completely approachable – but also shows life from the point of view of a beast of burden in the Roman empire of Second Century CE. Continue Reading →

ON THE SHORTNESS OF LIFE, ON HAPPINESS

on shortnessON THE SHORTNESS OF LIFE, ON HAPPINESS and Other Essays Volume 1

By Seneca the Younger
Read by James Cameron Stewart
6 hours 7 minutes

James Cameron Stewart

As former tutor and adviser to Emperor Nero, the philosopher and statesman Seneca was acutely aware how short life can be – his own life was cut short when ordered by the Emperor to commit suicide (for alleged involvement in a conspiracy). And Seneca proved true to his words – his life-long avowal to Stoicism enabled him to conduct himself with dignity to the end. Continue Reading →

ON ANGER, ON LEISURE, ON CLEMENCY

On angerON ANGER, ON LEISURE, ON CLEMENCY Essays Volume 2

By Seneca the Younger
Read by James Cameron Stewart
6 hours 36 minutes

James Cameron Stewart

On Anger is one of Seneca’s most important essays. At some length he investigates the nature of anger: how and why it emerges, the effect it has on the individual and those to whom it is directed; and how to manage it and prevent it even from arising. For, Seneca considers, anger simply serves no purpose – it does not bring courage in war, prevent others misbehaving, punish miscreants. In short, it has a negative effect on all. Continue Reading →

MEMORIES, DREAMS, REFLECTIONS

UA-Jung-Memories, Dreams, Reflections 2400pxMEMORIES, DREAMS, REFLECTIONS

By C. G. Jung
Read by James Cameron Stewart
16 hours 51 minutes

James Cameron Stewart

 

 

 

 

 

Carl Gustav Jung, the Swiss-born psychologist, was one of the giants of the 20th century. His wide-ranging studies, his clinical practice, and his open, searching mind transformed the way human psychology is viewed. He identified many key aspects of the human character and the words he chose are part of everyday life: introvert, extravert, archetypes, animus, anima, the shadow, the collective unconscious and many more. Memories, Dreams, Reflections is his fascinating and remarkable look at his own life. These frank revelations of the innermost life of one of the greatest explorers of the human mind is a unique document of our own and of all time. Continue Reading →

THE MORAL EPISTLES

THE MORAL EPISTLESTHE MORAL EPISTLES 124 Letters to Lucillius

By Seneca the Younger
Read by James Cameron Stewart
23 hours 18 minutes

James Cameron Stewart

 

 

 

 

Towards the end of his life, Seneca the Younger (c4 BCE- 65 CE) began a correspondence with a friend in Sicily, later collected under the title The Moral Epistles. In these 124 letters, Seneca expresses, in a wise, steady and calm manner, the philosophy by which he lived – derived essentially from the Stoics. The letters deal with a variety of specific topics – often eminently practical – such as ‘On Saving Time’, ‘On the Terrors of Death’, ‘On True and False Friendships’, ‘On Brawn and Brains’ and ‘On Old Age and Death’. His views are as relevant to us today as in his own time. He remarks on how we waste our time through lack of clarity of purpose, how we jump from one attraction to another, how fleeting is life. But these are letters to a friend, so the tone is not grandly didactic but friendly, personal, direct and speak to us across the centuries. Though not so well-known as Marcus Aurelius’s Meditations, The Moral Epistles are approachable, memorable, and immensely rich in content – and especially so in this sympathetic reading by James Cameron Stewart. Continue Reading →