Archive | Catalogue

JASON AND THE GOLDEN FLEECE

JASON AND THE GOLDEN FLEECE

By Apollonius of Rhodes
Read by Jonathan Keeble
6 hours 17 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

Jason and the Golden Fleece is one of the finest tales of Ancient Greece, an epic journey of adventure and trial standing beside similar stories of Perseus, Theseus and the Labours of Heracles. The finest classic account comes from Apollonius of Rhodes, the Greek poet of the 3rd century BCE and librarian at Alexandria. Continue Reading →

JUNG – An Introduction to his Psychology

JUNG – An Introduction to his Psychology

By Frieda Fordham
Read by Helen Lloyd
5 hours 18 minutes

This classic introduction to the psychology of Carl Gustav Jung is important because it is the only English original text he sanctioned in his lifetime. In his personal Foreword, he wrote: ‘Mrs Frieda Fordham has undertaken the by no means easy task of producing a readable resumé of all my various attempts at a better and more comprehensive understanding of the human psyche. She has delivered a fair and simple account of the main aspects of my psychological work. Continue Reading →

KANT AND THE PROBLEM OF METAPHYSICS

KANT AND THE PROBLEM OF METAPHYSICS

By Martin Heidegger
Read by Martyn Swain
8 hours 9 minutes

In 1929 Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) published his remarkable book, Kant and the Problem of Metaphysics. The Kantbuch, as Heidegger often called it, is regarded by many as a vital supplement to the unfinished second part of Heidegger’s most influential work, Being and Time, which was published two years earlier in 1927. Continue Reading →

LAND OF MEN

land-of-menLAND OF MEN (Wind Sand and Stars)

By Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Read by Nicholas Boulton
5 hours 18 minutes

boulton

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry is known universally for the gentle charm of Le Petit Prince, but it is this book, Land of Men – known originally in English as Wind, Sand and Stars – which is his masterpiece. First published in 1939, it documents Saint-Exupéry’s life as a pilot in the pioneering days of long-distance flying and in particular his experiences as a pilot transporting mail across countries, across continents. Continue Reading →

LANGUAGE, TRUTH AND LOGIC

LANGUAGE, TRUTH AND LOGIC

By A. J. AYER
Read by Michael Lunts
6 hours 43 minutes

Michael Lunts

The front cover of the second edition of Language, Truth and Logic carried this statement in capital letters: ‘THE CLASSIC TEXT WHICH FOUNDED LOGICAL POSITIVISM – AND MODERN BRITISH PHILOSOPHY.’ It was a bold statement, but the book, first published in 1936 when A. J. Ayer was just 25 and a lecturer on philosophy at Christ Church, Oxford, drew unstinting praise from leading figures in the field, including Bertrand Russell. Continue Reading →

LE GRAND MEAULNES

LE GRAND MEAULNESLE GRAND MEAULNES (The Wanderer)

By Alain-Fournier
Read by John Hollingworth
6 hours 57 minutes

John Hollingworth

He says little about his adventure on his return. But François eventually discovers that Meaulnes stumbled upon a strange party held at an unknown chateau, and became enmeshed in the lives of the beautiful young Yvonne de Galais and her brother Frantz. Continue Reading →

MATTER AND MEMORY

MATTER AND MEMORY

By Henri Bergson
Read by Michael Lunts
9 hours 13 minutes

Matter and Memory, (Matière et Mémoire) published in 1896, was the second book written by Henri Bergson (1859-1941), one of the leading French philosophers of his age. It followed Time and Free Will (1889) and helped to establish him as a major force in anti-mechanistic thought, opposing the trend towards uncompromisingly secular and scientific views. However, when Matter and Memory appeared Bergson was 39 and had yet to become the hugely influential figure he became in the first decades of the 20th century. Continue Reading →

MEMORIES, DREAMS, REFLECTIONS

UA-Jung-Memories, Dreams, Reflections 2400pxMEMORIES, DREAMS, REFLECTIONS

By C. G. Jung
Read by James Cameron Stewart
16 hours 51 minutes

James Cameron Stewart

 

 

 

 

 

Carl Gustav Jung, the Swiss-born psychologist, was one of the giants of the 20th century. His wide-ranging studies, his clinical practice, and his open, searching mind transformed the way human psychology is viewed. He identified many key aspects of the human character and the words he chose are part of everyday life: introvert, extravert, archetypes, animus, anima, the shadow, the collective unconscious and many more. Memories, Dreams, Reflections is his fascinating and remarkable look at his own life. These frank revelations of the innermost life of one of the greatest explorers of the human mind is a unique document of our own and of all time. Continue Reading →

MENGZI

MENGZI

With Selections from Traditional Commentaries

Translated and Read by Bryan W. Van Norden
9 hours 23 minutes

 

The Mengzi is one of the very greatest works of world literature and philosophy, and it is perhaps the single most influential Confucian text of all time.  Of all the Confucian classics, it is also the one most likely to speak to contemporary readers.  The Mengzi contains the dialogues, debates, and sayings of Mengzi, a Confucian sage of the fourth century BCE.  (He is also known by the Latinization of his name, “Mencius.”).  Continue Reading →

METAPHYSICS

METAPHYSICS

By Aristotle
Read by James Cameron Stewart
14 hours 30 minutes

Aristotle’s Metaphysics was the first major study of the subject of metaphysics – in other words, an inquiry into ‘first philosophy’, or ‘wisdom’. It differs from ‘Physics’ which is concerned with the natural world: things which are subject to the laws of nature, things that move and change, are measurable. Continue Reading →

MODERN MAN IN SEARCH OF A SOUL

MODERN MAN IN SEARCH OF A SOUL

By C.G Jung
Read by Martyn Swain
9 hours 11 minutes
 

This collection of eleven wide-ranging lectures which appeared originally in 1933, was based on lectures previously given when Jung was in the process of absorbing a considerable period of study of Eastern religions, Gnosticism and other religious sources. It was a time, according to the translator Cary F. Baynes, ‘when the Western world stands on the verge of a spiritual rebirth… Continue Reading →

MORALIA VOLUME 1 26 Ethical Essays

MORALIA VOLUME 1

By Plutarch
Read by Matthew Lloyd Davies
15 hours 01 minutes

Though best known now for his collection of lively and vivid Parallel Lives from ancient Greece and Rome, Plutarch (c46 C.D – 120 C.E)  was, for centuries, more respected for his Moralia, a remarkable and wide-ranging collection of essays and speeches. Continue Reading →

MORALIA Volume 2

MORALIA Volume 2

By Plutarch
Read by Matthew Lloyd Davies
14 hours 23 minutes

Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus (46 ce–after 119) was born in Chaeronea, Boeotia to a wealthy Greek family and assumed his full Latin name on becoming a Roman citizen. He made the most of his varied background and experience as a philosopher, magistrate, ambassador and priest at the Delphic Temple of Apollo, to become one of the most important biographers and essayists of Classical Greek and Roman times. Continue Reading →

MURPHY

murphyMURPHY

By Samuel Beckett
Read by Stephen Hogan
6 hours 51 minutes

 

‘The sun shone, having no alternative, on the nothing new.’ So opens Murphy, Samuel Beckett’s first novel, published in 1938. Its work-shy eponymous hero, adrift in London, realises that desire can never be satisfied and withdraws from life, in search of stupor. Continue Reading →

MUTUAL AID

MUTUAL AID

By Pyotr Kropotkin
Read by Peter Kenny
8 hours 24 minutes

PYOTR KROPOTKIN (1842-1921), one of the most individual political figures of his time, is best known as an influential anarchist communist. But he was also a scientist, geographer and philosopher, a man who, having grown up on his aristocratic father’s extensive country estate in Russia, had a deep understanding of, and love for, animals (wild and domesticated) the countryside and wildernesses. And all this was underpinned by a life committed to work for the good of humanity. Continue Reading →

NICOMACHEAN ETHICS AND EUDEMIAN ETHICS

NICOMACHEAN ETHICS AND EUDEMIAN ETHICS

By Aristotle
Read by Andrew Cullum
14 hours 42 minutes

Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Eudemian Ethics represent, in many ways, the Western classical springboard for the systematic study and implementation of ethics, the optimum behaviour of the individual. (By contrast, Aristotle’s Politics concerns the optimum blueprint for the city-state). Continue Reading →

NIETZSCHE AND BUDDHISM

NIETZSCHE AND BUDDHISM

By Robert G Morrison
Read by Michael Lunts
10 hours 36 minutes

Morrison offers an illuminating study of two linked traditions that have figured prominently in twentieth-century thought: Buddhism and the philosophy of Nietzsche. Nietzsche admired Buddhism, but saw it as a dangerously nihilistic religion; he forged his own affirmative philosophy in reaction against the nihilism that he feared would overwhelm Europe. Continue Reading →

OBLOMOV

OBLOMOV

By Ivan Goncharov
Read by Leighton Pugh
20 hours 07 minutes

Oblomov is one of the most distinctive characters in Russian literature – within a short time following its publication in 1859, the novel spawned its own saying: ‘Oblomovism’! From the pen of Ivan Goncharov (1812-1891) emerged a portrait of a young man, Ilya Ilyitch Oblomov who represented a figure well known in pre-revolutionary Russia at the time – one of the idle rich. Continue Reading →

OFFENCES AGAINST ONESELF

OFFENCES AGAINST ONESELF

By Jeremy Bentham, Károly Mária Kertbeny
Read by Andrew Cullum
4 hours 1 minutes

The criminalisation of homosexuality over centuries has been one of the shocking injustices of European history – it existed from the middle ages and before, and well into the 20th century. The death penalty (hanging or burning) was a commonplace feature in legal systems. These two remarkable texts – one from England in the 18th century, and one from Germany in the 19th century  – show how there was a growing awareness of the prejudice and the cruelty of its effect. Continue Reading →

ON ANGER, ON LEISURE, ON CLEMENCY

On angerON ANGER, ON LEISURE, ON CLEMENCY Essays Volume 2

By Seneca the Younger
Read by James Cameron Stewart
6 hours 36 minutes

James Cameron Stewart

On Anger is one of Seneca’s most important essays. At some length he investigates the nature of anger: how and why it emerges, the effect it has on the individual and those to whom it is directed; and how to manage it and prevent it even from arising. For, Seneca considers, anger simply serves no purpose – it does not bring courage in war, prevent others misbehaving, punish miscreants. In short, it has a negative effect on all. Continue Reading →