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STUDIES IN THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SEX VOLUME 2

STUDIES IN THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SEX VOLUME 2

Sexual Inversion – Homosexuality
By Havelock Ellis
Read by Charles Armstrong
16 hours 29 minutes

The seven volumes of Studies in the Psychology of Sex by Havelock Ellis (1859-1939) which appeared between 1900 and 1928 were each a landmark in the more open considerations of sexual impulse in the Western world. And none more so than Volume 2 which appeared in 1900. It examined homosexuality, though Ellis more frequently used the term ‘sexual inversion’ which, at the time, had broader (but not derogatory) implications. Continue Reading →

AN INQUIRY INTO THE HUMAN MIND: ON THE PRINCIPLES OF COMMON SENSE

AN INQUIRY INTO THE HUMAN MIND: ON THE PRINCIPLES OF COMMON SENSE

by Thomas Reid

Read by James Gillies
11 hours 58 minutes

Though now little known outside specialist philosophical circles, the Scottish philosopher Thomas Reid (1710-1796) is remembered both for the founding of the Scottish School of Common Sense and his major work, An Inquiry into the Human Mind:on the Principles of Common Sense (1764). With his feet firmly on the ground, he challenged the speculative ideas of David Hume and George Berkeley who regarded ideas in the mind as a basis for the external world. Continue Reading →

THE REVOLUTION BETRAYED

THE REVOLUTION BETRAYED

What is the Soviet Union and where is it going?

By Leon Trotsky
Read by Jonathan Booth
tbc minutes

 

It is June 1936. Leon Trotsky (1879-1940) has finally been granted a visa for asylum in Norway, having been banned first from living in Paris, and then the whole of France.  With him comes the draft of The Revolution Betrayed: What is the Soviet Union and where is it going?, which is completed and sent to the publishers on the 4th of August. Continue Reading →

THE LIFE AND MIRACLES OF ST CUTHBERT

THE LIFE AND MIRACLES OF ST CUTHBERT

By The Venerable Bede
Read by Peter Wickham
2 hours 57 minutes

For centuries, St Cuthbert (c634-687) was the most worshipped saint in England, revered for his virtuous life and his miracles. Even centuries after his death, stories were told of his body remaining ‘incorrupt’ in his tomb. What we know about his work and character comes from the records and significantly from the writings of the Venerable Bede (673-735). His Life of St Cuthbert (published in 721) was part of the tradition of hagiography, a reverential biography of a saint. Continue Reading →

THE HISTORIES

THE HISTORIES

By POLYBIUS
Read by Jonathan Booth
37 hours 38 minutes

 

How did the city state of Rome rise inexorably to become the dominant power in the Mediterranean and much of the Western world? In short, first of all it overcame the established Carthaginian Empire despite the remarkable exploits of Hannibal. And, largely at the same time, it gradually subjugated the many and varied city states of Greece, despite various allied opposition. Continue Reading →

ON WAR

ON WAR

By Carl von Clausewitz
Read by Martyn Swain
29 hours 20 minutes

On War was first published in 1832, at a time when muskets and cavalry were a dominating presence on the battlefield. Yet in the 21st century it remains a much-read and studied treatise on the subject – perhaps the most important European classic of its kind – and this despite the author’s demise before he could finish what was an extended review of the whole subject of military strategy. Continue Reading →

THE ANTIQUITIES OF THE JEWS

THE ANTIQUITIES OF THE JEWSTHE ANTIQUITIES OF THE JEWS

By Josephus
Read by Allan Corduner
51 hours 46 minutes

 

 

 

 

Among the many important historical documents from the Classical world of Greece and Rome, The Antiquities of the Jews by Flavius Josephus is one of the most distinctive and characterful. Josephus (37–c100 CE) set out with the clear purpose of telling the history of the Jews from the creation in Genesis to the outbreak of the Jewish revolt against the Romans in 66 CE. Born in Jerusalem as Yosef ben Matityahu, he rose to become a leading participant in the First Jewish Revolt (66-73 CE). Continue Reading →

EMILE or ON EDUCATION

EMILE or ON EDUCATIONEMILE or ON EDUCATION

By Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Read by Jonathan Booth
22 hours 42 minutes

 

The Social Contract and Discourse on Inequality may be the two principal philosophical works for which Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) is remembered today, but his educational treatise-novel, Emile or On Education can claim to be an equally important and, for its time, radical work. Published in 1762, it had a profound impact on the approach to the education and upbringing of a child, through infancy, childhood, adolescence and into adulthood. Continue Reading →

THE MAXIMS

THE MAXIMSTHE MAXIMS

By The Duc de la Rochefoucauld

Read by David Rintoul
3 hours and 26 minutes

‘There’s no fool like an old fool’…’The world is full of pots calling kettles black’… ‘We can no more set a term to our passions than to our life’. These are just three of the aphorisms that made the collection of Maxims by François, Duc de la Rochefoucauld an enduring influence upon succeeding generations following their initial publication in 1665. Continue Reading →

INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL CHINESE PHILOSOPHY

INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL CHINESE PHILOSOPHY

by Bryan W. Van Norden
Read by Brian Nishii

11 hours 09 minutes

‘This book is an introduction in the very best sense of the word. It provides the beginner with an accurate, sophisticated yet, accessible account, and offers new insights and challenging perspectives to those who have a more specialised knowledge.’ – Lee H. Yearley, Walter Y. Evans-Wentz Professor, Religious Studies, Stanford University. In fact, Van Norden’s ‘Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy’ is evidently also of increasing importance in balancing our 21st century view of philosophy in general. Continue Reading →

SUMMA THEOLOGICA VOLUME 4 PART III (TERTIA PARS)

SUMMA THEOLOGICA VOLUME 4 PART III (TERTIA PARS)


By Thomas Aquinas

Read by Martyn Swain
47 hours 52 minutes

Summa Theologica Part III (Tertia Pars) is Volume 4 in Ukemi Audiobooks’ complete recording of Thomas Aquinas’s momentous work on Christian theology and philosophy. Born in Sicily in 1225, he was a friar in the Dominican Order, but during his lifetime he was recognized as a leading figure through his writings as a philosopher, theologian and jurist. He was the first major Christian theologian to absorb the ideas of Aristotle, Averroes and other non-Christian figures, a stance that made him a target for criticism. Continue Reading →

A PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAY ON PROBABILITIES

A PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAY ON PROBABILITIESA PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAY ON PROBABILITIES

By Pierre-Simon Laplace
Read by Charles Armstrong
5 hours 03 minutes


Pierre-Simon, Marquis de Laplace (1749-1827) is often described as the ‘French Newton’, though he lived a century later.His working life took him through the French Revolution, the Napoleonic era – during which he enjoyed various political positions – and afterwards, to the Bourbon Restoration. Continue Reading →

THE ESSENCE OF CHRISTIANITY

THE ESSENCE OF CHRISTIANITYTHE ESSENCE OF CHRISTIANITY


By Ludwig Feuerbach

Read by Martyn Swain
12 hours 08 minutes

This extraordinary work (Das Wesen Des Christentums) is an anthropological dissection of Christianity in particular and a critique of religion in general. It proved both controversial and influential following its publication in 1841. But soon it became a classic of humanism – so much so that it was none other than George Eliot, under her real name of Marian (Mary Ann) Evans, who felt impelled to undertake the first English translation (1851), and which helped to underscore her humanistic attitudes which infused her novels. Continue Reading →

REFLECTIONS ON VIOLENCE

REFLECTIONS ON VIOLENCE

By Georges Sorel
Read by Charles Armstrong
8 hours 41 minutes

More than a century after Reflections on Violence first appeared (1908) it remains a remarkably controversial essay. The concept of violence as a means to an end (social, religious, political or for aggrandisement) is hugely challenging as a philosophical subject – yet it is, of course, universally (and frequently) pursued. The French thinker and political theorist Georges Sorel (1847-1922), fired up by his interest in Marxism and his anger at the injustice of the Dreyfus case, faced this challenge and in the seven chapters of Reflections on Violence he explored the question. Continue Reading →

CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON

CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON

By Immanuel KANT
Read by Michael Lunts
27 hours 38 minutes

Michael Lunts

Immanuel Kant’s ‘Critique of Pure Reason’ can lay claim to being the most important single work of modern philosophy, a work whose methodology, if not necessarily always its conclusions, has had a profound influence on almost all subsequent philosophical discourse. In this work Kant addresses, in a ground-breaking elucidation of the nature of reason, the age-old question of philosophy: “How do we know what we know?” and the limits of what it is that we can know with certainty. Continue Reading →

EARLY GREEK PHILOSOPHY

EARLY GREEK PHILOSOPHY

The Pre-Socratics
By John Burnet
Read by Jonathan Booth
9 hours 50 minutes

 

In his Introduction to Early Greek Philosophy, John Burnet points out the particular focus of the Pre-Socratics on the ‘cosmological’ character of their enquiries. They determined, he explains, to look into the natural world around them. The period can be said to mark the rise of scientific enquiry epitomised by the Atomists, and the mathematicians of the Pythagorean School. It was this focus on natural phenomena that set the pattern for the activity that became known as philosophy. Continue Reading →

THE SPHERE AND DUTIES OF GOVERNMENT

THE SPHERE AND DUTIES OF GOVERNMENT

By Wilhelm von Humboldt
Read by Derek Le Page

8 hours 36 minutes

Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835) now lives under the shadow cast by his more famous brother Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859, naturalist, explorer, geographer and much else) but Wilhelm was an important figure in Prussian-German history in his own right. He contributed considerably through his work as a diplomat, educationalist (he was one of the principal founders of the Humboldt University of Berlin), philologist and linguist. Continue Reading →

MATTER AND MEMORY

MATTER AND MEMORY

By Henri Bergson
Read by Michael Lunts
9 hours 13 minutes

Matter and Memory, (Matière et Mémoire) published in 1896, was the second book written by Henri Bergson (1859-1941), one of the leading French philosophers of his age. It followed Time and Free Will (1889) and helped to establish him as a major force in anti-mechanistic thought, opposing the trend towards uncompromisingly secular and scientific views. However, when Matter and Memory appeared Bergson was 39 and had yet to become the hugely influential figure he became in the first decades of the 20th century. Continue Reading →

THE DECLINE OF THE WEST

THE DECLINE OF THE WEST

By Oswald Spengler
Read by Peter Wickham
56 hours 49 minutes

The Decline of the West – Volume 1 published in 1917, Volume 2 in 1922 – has exercised and challenged opinion ever since. It was a huge undertaking by Oswald Spengler (1880-1936), formerly an unpublished historian and philosopher who set out to radically reconsider history – the rise and fall of world civilisations and their cultures. His primary view was to reject the established Eurocentric paradigm (Ancient/Classical, Medieval – and, following the Renaissance – Modern) and to take a totally new perspective. Continue Reading →

PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS

PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS

By Ludwig Wittgenstein

Read by Jonathan Booth
9 hours 34 minutes

 

Philosophical Investigations – a landmark in 20th century philosophy – was published in 1953, two years after the death of its author. In the Preface written in Cambridge in 1945 where he was professor of philosophy he states: ‘Four years ago I had occasion to re-read my first book (the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus) and to explain its ideas to someone. Continue Reading →