Archive | Catalogue

THE ANTIQUITIES OF THE JEWS

THE ANTIQUITIES OF THE JEWSTHE ANTIQUITIES OF THE JEWS

By Josephus
Read by Allan Corduner
51 hours 46 minutes

 

 

 

 

Among the many important historical documents from the Classical world of Greece and Rome, The Antiquities of the Jews by Flavius Josephus is one of the most distinctive and characterful. Josephus (37–c100 CE) set out with the clear purpose of telling the history of the Jews from the creation in Genesis to the outbreak of the Jewish revolt against the Romans in 66 CE. Born in Jerusalem as Yosef ben Matityahu, he rose to become a leading participant in the First Jewish Revolt (66-73 CE). Continue Reading →

EMILE or ON EDUCATION

EMILE or ON EDUCATIONEMILE or ON EDUCATION

By Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Read by Jonathan Booth
22 hours 42 minutes

 

The Social Contract and Discourse on Inequality may be the two principal philosophical works for which Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) is remembered today, but his educational treatise-novel, Emile or On Education can claim to be an equally important and, for its time, radical work. Published in 1762, it had a profound impact on the approach to the education and upbringing of a child, through infancy, childhood, adolescence and into adulthood. Continue Reading →

THE MAXIMS

THE MAXIMSTHE MAXIMS

By The Duc de la Rochefoucauld

Read by David Rintoul
3 hours and 26 minutes

‘There’s no fool like an old fool’…’The world is full of pots calling kettles black’… ‘We can no more set a term to our passions than to our life’. These are just three of the aphorisms that made the collection of Maxims by François, Duc de la Rochefoucauld an enduring influence upon succeeding generations following their initial publication in 1665. Continue Reading →

A PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAY ON PROBABILITIES

A PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAY ON PROBABILITIESA PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAY ON PROBABILITIES

By Pierre-Simon Laplace
Read by Charles Armstrong
5 hours 03 minutes


Pierre-Simon, Marquis de Laplace (1749-1827) is often described as the ‘French Newton’, though he lived a century later.His working life took him through the French Revolution, the Napoleonic era – during which he enjoyed various political positions – and afterwards, to the Bourbon Restoration. Continue Reading →

THE ESSENCE OF CHRISTIANITY

THE ESSENCE OF CHRISTIANITYTHE ESSENCE OF CHRISTIANITY


By Ludwig Feuerbach

Read by Martyn Swain
12 hours 08 minutes

This extraordinary work (Das Wesen Des Christentums) is an anthropological dissection of Christianity in particular and a critique of religion in general. It proved both controversial and influential following its publication in 1841. But soon it became a classic of humanism – so much so that it was none other than George Eliot, under her real name of Marian (Mary Ann) Evans, who felt impelled to undertake the first English translation (1851), and which helped to underscore her humanistic attitudes which infused her novels. Continue Reading →

INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL CHINESE PHILOSOPHY

INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL CHINESE PHILOSOPHY

by Bryan W. Van Norden
Read by Brian Nishii

11 hours 09 minutes

‘This book is an introduction in the very best sense of the word. It provides the beginner with an accurate, sophisticated yet, accessible account, and offers new insights and challenging perspectives to those who have a more specialised knowledge.’ – Lee H. Yearley, Walter Y. Evans-Wentz Professor, Religious Studies, Stanford University. In fact, Van Norden’s ‘Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy’ is evidently also of increasing importance in balancing our 21st century view of philosophy in general. Continue Reading →

SUMMA THEOLOGICA VOLUME 4 PART III (TERTIA PARS)

SUMMA THEOLOGICA VOLUME 4 PART III (TERTIA PARS)


By Thomas Aquinas

Read by Martyn Swain
47 hours 52 minutes

Summa Theologica Part III (Tertia Pars) is Volume 4 in Ukemi Audiobooks’ complete recording of Thomas Aquinas’s momentous work on Christian theology and philosophy. Born in Sicily in 1225, he was a friar in the Dominican Order, but during his lifetime he was recognized as a leading figure through his writings as a philosopher, theologian and jurist. He was the first major Christian theologian to absorb the ideas of Aristotle, Averroes and other non-Christian figures, a stance that made him a target for criticism. Continue Reading →

REFLECTIONS ON VIOLENCE

REFLECTIONS ON VIOLENCE

By Georges Sorel
Read by Charles Armstrong
8 hours 41 minutes

More than a century after Reflections on Violence first appeared (1908) it remains a remarkably controversial essay. The concept of violence as a means to an end (social, religious, political or for aggrandisement) is hugely challenging as a philosophical subject – yet it is, of course, universally (and frequently) pursued. The French thinker and political theorist Georges Sorel (1847-1922), fired up by his interest in Marxism and his anger at the injustice of the Dreyfus case, faced this challenge and in the seven chapters of Reflections on Violence he explored the question. Continue Reading →

CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON

CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON

By Immanuel KANT
Read by Michael Lunts
27 hours 38 minutes

Michael Lunts

Immanuel Kant’s ‘Critique of Pure Reason’ can lay claim to being the most important single work of modern philosophy, a work whose methodology, if not necessarily always its conclusions, has had a profound influence on almost all subsequent philosophical discourse. In this work Kant addresses, in a ground-breaking elucidation of the nature of reason, the age-old question of philosophy: “How do we know what we know?” and the limits of what it is that we can know with certainty. Continue Reading →

EARLY GREEK PHILOSOPHY

EARLY GREEK PHILOSOPHY

The Pre-Socratics
By John Burnet
Read by Jonathan Booth
9 hours 50 minutes

 

In his Introduction to Early Greek Philosophy, John Burnet points out the particular focus of the Pre-Socratics on the ‘cosmological’ character of their enquiries. They determined, he explains, to look into the natural world around them. The period can be said to mark the rise of scientific enquiry epitomised by the Atomists, and the mathematicians of the Pythagorean School. It was this focus on natural phenomena that set the pattern for the activity that became known as philosophy. Continue Reading →

THE SPHERE AND DUTIES OF GOVERNMENT

THE SPHERE AND DUTIES OF GOVERNMENT

By Wilhelm von Humboldt
Read by Derek Le Page

8 hours 36 minutes

Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835) now lives under the shadow cast by his more famous brother Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859, naturalist, explorer, geographer and much else) but Wilhelm was an important figure in Prussian-German history in his own right. He contributed considerably through his work as a diplomat, educationalist (he was one of the principal founders of the Humboldt University of Berlin), philologist and linguist. Continue Reading →

MATTER AND MEMORY

MATTER AND MEMORY

By Henri Bergson
Read by Michael Lunts
9 hours 13 minutes

Matter and Memory, (Matière et Mémoire) published in 1896, was the second book written by Henri Bergson (1859-1941), one of the leading French philosophers of his age. It followed Time and Free Will (1889) and helped to establish him as a major force in anti-mechanistic thought, opposing the trend towards uncompromisingly secular and scientific views. However, when Matter and Memory appeared Bergson was 39 and had yet to become the hugely influential figure he became in the first decades of the 20th century. Continue Reading →

THE DECLINE OF THE WEST

THE DECLINE OF THE WEST

By Oswald Spengler
Read by Peter Wickham
56 hours 49 minutes

The Decline of the West – Volume 1 published in 1917, Volume 2 in 1922 – has exercised and challenged opinion ever since. It was a huge undertaking by Oswald Spengler (1880-1936), formerly an unpublished historian and philosopher who set out to radically reconsider history – the rise and fall of world civilisations and their cultures. His primary view was to reject the established Eurocentric paradigm (Ancient/Classical, Medieval – and, following the Renaissance – Modern) and to take a totally new perspective. Continue Reading →

PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS

PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS

By Ludwig Wittgenstein

Read by Jonathan Booth
9 hours 34 minutes

 

Philosophical Investigations – a landmark in 20th century philosophy – was published in 1953, two years after the death of its author. In the Preface written in Cambridge in 1945 where he was professor of philosophy he states: ‘Four years ago I had occasion to re-read my first book (the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus) and to explain its ideas to someone. Continue Reading →

PROLEGOMENA

PROLEGOMENA

TO ANY FUTURE METAPHYSICS THAT WILL BE ABLE TO PRESENT ITSELF AS A SCIENCE

By Immanuel KANT
Read by Michael Lunts
5 hours 45 minutes

Michael Lunts
Kant’s Prolegomena, although a small book, is without doubt the most important of his writings, writes the translator, Paul Carus. Prolegomena means, literally, prefatory or introductory remarks and it furnishes us with a key to his main work, The Critique of Pure Reason; in fact, it is an extract containing all the salient ideas of Kant’s system. Continue Reading →

THE ARCHETYPES AND THE COLLECTIVE UNCONSCIOUS

THE ARCHETYPES AND THE COLLECTIVE UNCONSCIOUSTHE ARCHETYPES AND THE COLLECTIVE UNCONSCIOUS

By C.G Jung
Read by Martyn Swain
13 hours 44 minutes
 

What are Archetypes? What is the Collective Unconscious? Both these concepts are two of Jung’s most famous and exciting ideas. In this volume, taken from the Collective Works, Jung describes and elaborates upon these two central concepts of his psychology. Included are essays on specific archetypes, a study of the process of individuation, and an account of mandala symbolism. Continue Reading →

THE NOTEBOOKS OF MALTE LAURIDS BRIGGE

THE NOTEBOOKS OF MALTE LAURIDS BRIGGE

By Rainer Maria Rilke
Read by Jamie Parker
8 hours 9 minutes

This remarkable book is the only novel by Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926), the greatest German-language poet of his time. It is, in a sense, a true curiosity – dark and intense – and possesses, not surprisingly, strong elements of autobiography. The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge (Die Aufzeichnungen des Malte Laurids Brigge), has even been described as an anti-novel. Continue Reading →

THE UNDISCOVERED SELF

THE UNDISCOVERED SELF

By C.G Jung
Read by David Rintoul
2 hours 30 minutes

 David Rintoul

In The Undiscovered Self Jung explains the essence of his teaching for a readership unfamiliar with his ideas. He highlights the importance of individual responsibility and freedom in the context of today’s mass society, and argues that individuals must organize themselves as effectively as the organized mass if they are to resist joining it. Continue Reading →

THE LAYS OF MARIE DE FRANCE

THE LAYS OF MARIE DE FRANCE

Translated by Edward J. Gallagher

Read by Georgina Sutton, David Rintoul
5 hours and 6 minutes

The 12 Lays of Marie de France offer one of the most striking collections of short narrative poems of the 12th century – two centuries before Chaucer.  Written in Anglo-French, they contain beguiling and entertaining stories of love and romance, of chivalry and adventure with, sometimes, even a magical twist. They are especially unique in early literature by being ascribed to a female poet, Marie de France: in the very first Lay – Guigemar – is the introductory line: ‘Hear my Lords, what Marie says, who does not wish to be forgotten in her time.’ Continue Reading →

PSYCHOLOGY OF THE UNCONSCIOUS

PSYCHOLOGY OF THE UNCONSCIOUS

By C.G Jung
Read by Martyn Swain
16 hours 31 minutes
 

Published first in 1912, Psychology of the Unconscious was one of the most important stepping stones in the development of Jung’s thought and practice. It has a long subtitle: ‘A Study of the Transformations and Symbolisms of the Libido. A Contribution to the History of the Evolution of Thought’. This expressed the underlying impetus – a break from the view of the libido and its functions as taught by Sigmund Freud, which Jung had earlier adopted. Continue Reading →