Archive | Catalogue

THE ENGLISH CONSTITUTION

THE ENGLISH CONSTITUTION

By Walter Bagehot
Read by Peter Wickham
11 hours 20 minutes

Though published in 1867 when the British Empire was approaching its height, Walter Bagehot’s essay The English Constitution is not only one of the great political classics but is also an unquestionably relevant document for our times. Despite the passing of over 150 years, despite huge changes in enfranchisement, in attitudes, and in world order, this fascinating document prompts us to re-evaluate the process of government – wherever we live. And what is more, it is written with grace, elegance – and wit! Continue Reading →

ENQUIRY CONCERNING POLITICAL JUSTICE And its Influence on Morals and Happiness

ENQUIRY CONCERNING POLITICAL JUSTICE

And its Influence on Morals and Happiness

By William Godwin
Read by Michael Lunts
27 hours 49 minutes

Michael Lunts

Enquiry Concerning Political Justice and Its Influence on Morals and Happiness by William Godwin (1756-1836) was first published in February 1793, the month following the execution of Louis XVI of France. It proved to be immediately popular and influential. Godwin, the son of a Calvinist preacher, was educated at Hoxton Academy, after which, he became a minister to a dissenter congregation in Ware. Continue Reading →

KANT AND THE PROBLEM OF METAPHYSICS

KANT AND THE PROBLEM OF METAPHYSICS

By Martin Heidegger
Read by Martyn Swain
8 hours 9 minutes

In 1929 Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) published his remarkable book, Kant and the Problem of Metaphysics. The Kantbuch, as Heidegger often called it, is regarded by many as a vital supplement to the unfinished second part of Heidegger’s most influential work, Being and Time, which was published two years earlier in 1927. Continue Reading →

SUMMA THEOLOGICA Volume 2 Part I of Part II (Prima Secundae)

SUMMA THEOLOGICA Volume 2 Part I of Part II (Prima Secundae)

By Thomas Aquinas
Read by Martyn Swain
48 hours 32 minutes

Summa Theologica consists of three main Parts. The second Part is divided two and this recording presents Prima Secundae – the Part I of Part II. Taken in its entirety Summa Theologica forms an essential contribution to the canon of Catholic doctrine and was written in the last decade of his life by Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) an Italian-born Dominican Friar. Although he died before completing it the body of thought it contains is a continuing influence to the education and guidance of students of theology in the main Christian traditions. Continue Reading →

PERCEVAL The Story of the Grail

PERCEVAL The Story of the Grail

By Chrétien de Troyes
Read by Mike Rogers
16 hours 40 minutes

Chrétien de Troyes’ Perceval is the most important single Arthurian romance. It contains the very first mention of the mysterious grail, later to become the Holy Grail and the focal point of the spiritual quest of the knights of Arthur’s court. Chrétien left the poem unfinished, but the extraordinary and intriguing theme of the Grail was too good to leave, and other poets continued and eventually completed it. Continue Reading →

THE WEALTH OF NATIONS

THE WEALTH OF NATIONS

By Adam SMITH
Read by Michael Lunts
16 hours 28 minutes

Michael Lunts

The Wealth of Nations, first published in 1776, is the first book of modern political economy and still provides the foundation for the study of that discipline. An Enquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, to give it is full title, it was an immediate bestseller, and has since rightfully claimed its place in the Western intellectual canon. Its author, Adam Smith (1723-1790), was one of the brightest stars of the 18th century Scottish Enlightenment. Continue Reading →

MORALIA Volume 2

MORALIA Volume 2

By Plutarch
Read by Matthew Lloyd Davies
14 hours 23 minutes

Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus (46 ce–after 119) was born in Chaeronea, Boeotia to a wealthy Greek family and assumed his full Latin name on becoming a Roman citizen. He made the most of his varied background and experience as a philosopher, magistrate, ambassador and priest at the Delphic Temple of Apollo, to become one of the most important biographers and essayists of Classical Greek and Roman times. Continue Reading →

TIME AND FREE WILL

TIME AND FREE WILL

An Essay on the Immediate Data of Consciousness

By Henri Bergson
Read by Michael Lunts
6 hours 44 minutes

Henri Bergson (1859 – 1941) was the leading French philosopher of the first half of the twentieth century. Near the end of his life when he was forced to register with the police in Nazi occupied France he wrote: ‘Academic. Philosopher. Nobel prize winner. Jew.’ Continue Reading →

PIERS PLOWMAN Vision of a People’s Christ

PIERS PLOWMAN Vision of a People’s Christ

By William Langland – Modern Verse Rendering by William Burrell

Read by Mike Rogers
4 hours 42 minutes

Probably written in the latter half of the 14th century in the South-West-Midlands dialect, Piers Plowman is a remarkable example of allegorical, alliterative verse that conveyed, for the first time ever, the authentic voice, spirit and character of the ordinary people of England. Very little is known about William Langland, the presumed author, but it is very much a product of the medieval mind combining Christian belief with dramatic poetry in a drama of identity. Continue Reading →

ALEXANDER HAMILTON

ALEXANDER HAMILTON America’s Founding Father of Finance

His Original Reports on: PUBLIC FINANCE • A NATIONAL BANK • MANUFACTURES

Introduced and compiled by Mark G. Spencer
Read by Adam Sims and John Chancer
8 hours 23 minutes

 

Though best known for his primary authorship of the Federalist Papers, his death in a duel at the hands of the Vice President Aaron Burr on the banks of the Hudson River, and his star role in a 21st century musical, it is often overlooked that Alexander Hamilton was instrumental in creating the key financial building blocks of the young United States of America. Continue Reading →

THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN

THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN

By Thomas Mann
Read by David Rintoul
37 hours 27 minutes

 David Rintoul

It was The Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg) that confirmed Thomas Mann as a Nobel prizewinner for literature and rightly so, for it is undoubtedly one of the great novels of the 20th century. Its unusual story – it opens with a young man visiting a friend in a tuberculosis sanatorium in the Swiss Alps – was originally started by Mann in 1912, but was not completed until 1924. Continue Reading →

SUMMA THEOLOGICA PART I (PRIMA PARS)

SUMMA THEOLOGICA PART I (PRIMA PARS)

By Thomas Aquinas
Read by Martyn Swain
52 hours 33 minutes

The Summa Theologica, a fundamental text in Catholic doctrine, is a compendium of theology that has been studied and debated since its first publication in the 13th century. Furthermore, it has been widely regarded as one of the classics of Western philosophy, not least because, perhaps for the first time in such a systematic manner, it set out to consider the views of non-Christian figures such as Aristotle, Boethius, Muslim writers including Averroes (Ibn Rushd) and Avicenna (Ibn Sina) and the Sephardic Jewish scholar Maimonides. Continue Reading →

THE OLD MAN IN THE CORNER

THE OLD MAN IN THE CORNER

By Baroness Orczy
Read by Martyn Swain
7 hours 04 minutes

An old man sits in the corner of a London tea house. It is the early years of the 20th century.  In comes a young lady reporter, and a conversation ensues. “Mysteries!” he comments. “There is no such thing as a mystery in connection with any crime, provided intelligence is brought to bear upon its investigation.” At first, the reporter wants to terminate the exchange, swiftly. But she cannot walk away when a notorious unsolved murder becomes the topic of their conversation and this slightly disreputable yet decided character declares that the solution, of course, is obvious! Continue Reading →

EPICURUS OF SAMOS: HIS PHILSOPHY AND LIFE

EPICURUS OF SAMOS: HIS PHILSOPHY AND LIFE

All the Principal Source Texts Compiled and Introduced by Hiram Crespo

Read by James Gillies and Jonathan Booth
6 hours 21 minutes

Epicurus of Samos (341-270 BCE) was the founder of the philosophical system to which he gave his name: Epicureanism. It is a label that is often misused and misunderstood today, with ‘a life of pleasure’ as the key aim misinterpreted as a life of indulgence. In fact, the philosophy of Epicurus demonstrated also by his life, was anything but! Continue Reading →

IDEAS

IDEAS

By Edmund Husserl
Read by Leighton Pugh with an Introduction by Taylor Carman
16 hours 56 minutes

As philosophy professor Taylor Carman explains in his helpful Introduction, Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) was the founder of modern phenomenology, one of the most important and influential movements of the 20thcentury. ‘Ideas’ published in 1913 – its full title is ‘Ideas for a Pure Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy’ – was the key work. It is arguably ‘the most fundamental and comprehensive statement of the fundamental principles of Husserl’s mature philosophy.’ Continue Reading →

THE ACCUMULATION OF CAPITAL

THE ACCUMULATION OF CAPITAL

By Rosa Luxemburg
Read by Louise Barrett
17 hours 27 minutes

Rosa Luxemburg (1870-1919) was one of the most able and remarkable female figures in the fight for socialism and the demolition of capitalism from the last decade of the 19th century to her death just after World War One. Born in Zamosc, a small town in Russian Poland, she rose to become a highly educated and highly principled economist and activist, working with leading figures of the left, including Lenin. Continue Reading →

The Rig Veda

The Rig Veda

Verse translation by Ralph T.H. Griffith (revised and modernised)
Read by SAGAR ARYA
41 hours 22 minutes

Often appearing as Ṛgveda, the oldest of the four sacred books linked to Hinduism, was composed in an ancient form of Sanskrit about 1500 BCE. The Rig Veda was preserved in secrecy by ancient clans, initially orally, before it was written down about 300 BCE. These 1,028 poems, grouped as ten ‘Circles’ (mandalas), have variously been called hymns, poems or songs by Sanskrit scholars. The Rik (so pronounced by the ancient Angirases clans, or Seer-Priest families) was an experiment with sound. The emphasis is always on sounding the words perfectly. Continue Reading →

WILHELM MEISTER’S APPRENTICESHIP

WILHELM MEISTER’S APPRENTICESHIP

By Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Read by Leighton Pugh
22 hours 57 minutes

Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship – Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre was the original German title – was Goethe’s second novel, published 1795-6, almost two decades after The Sorrows of Young Werther. It again focuses on a young man, but this time on his growing understanding and maturity as he makes his way in the world. Continue Reading →

BETWEEN THE ACTS

BETWEEN THE ACTS

By Virginia Woolf
Read by Georgina Sutton
5 hours 42 minutes

Between The Acts, Virginia Woolf’s last novel, was finished in November 1940 and shortly afterwards delivered to her publisher Hogarth Press. The following March she committed suicide. Between the Acts is often an overlooked work in her oeuvre because she did express her intention to revise it before publication, though in the event this never happened. So it comes as a surprise to find that, while it probably would have benefitted from revision, it is something of an unpolished gem, at times sparkling and actually very engaging. Continue Reading →

COLLECTED PAPERS ON ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY

COLLECTED PAPERS ON ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY

By C.G Jung
Read by Martyn Swain
17 hours 49 minutes

Collected Papers on Analytical Psychology comprises a selection of key writings and lectures by Carl Gustav Jung produced between 1902 and 1916, which are presented in chronological order. As such they provide a fascinating exposition of the nature and essence of the psychological content of psychoses and neuroses, as explored and discovered by Dr Jung in the early years of his long and distinguished career. Continue Reading →