Archive | Catalogue

THE COMMON READER VOLUME 2

THE COMMON READER VOLUME 2

By Virginia Woolf
Read by Georgina Sutton
9 hours 28 minutes

Do not think, because this collection of essays is titled Volume 2, that there is anything lesser or additional to it. Here is Virginia Woolf at her most entertaining and informative, relishing the portraits and insights she presents as she surveys a varied collection of individuals in English society and English literature. Continue Reading →

ON THE NATURE OF THE PSYCHE

ON THE NATURE OF THE PSYCHE

By C.G. Jung
Read by John Telfer
6 hours 30 minutes

 

Jung’s discovery of the ‘collective unconscious’, a psychic inheritance common to all humankind, transformed the understanding of the self and the way we interpret the world. In On the Nature of the Psyche Jung describes this remarkable theory in his own words, and presents a masterly overview of his theories of the unconscious, and its relation to the conscious mind. Continue Reading →

ANSWER TO JOB

ANSWER TO JOB

By C.G. Jung
Read by John Telfer
5 hours 9 minutes

 

Of all the books of the Bible, few have had more resonance for modern readers than the Book of Job. For a world that over the past century has witnessed horrors the like of which could not have been imagined by earlier generations, Job’s cries of despair and incomprehension are all too recognizable. Continue Reading →

THE MAN WITHOUT QUALITIES

THE MAN WITHOUT QUALITIES

By Robert Musil
Read by John Telfer
60 hours 30 minutes

 

In 1913, the Viennese aristocracy is gathering to celebrate the 17th jubilee of the accession of Emperor Franz Josef, even as the Austro-Hungarian Empire is collapsing and the rest of Vienna is showing signs of rebellion. At the centre of this social labyrinth is Ulrich: a veteran, a seducer and a scientist, yet also a man ‘without qualities’ and therefore a brilliant and detached observer of his changing world. Continue Reading →

HISTORY OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION

HISTORY OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION

By Leon Trotsky
Read by Jonathan Booth
53 hours 06 minutes

 

The Russian Revolution of 1917 was one of the most cataclysmic events in world history, profoundly shaping politics, international relations, social patterns, economics and science in the century that followed. It created long-lasting aftershocks which travelled far beyond its geographical borders. How did it happen? Continue Reading →

THE PILLOW BOOK of SEI SHŌNAGON

THE PILLOW BOOK of SEI SHŌNAGON

Translated by Ivan Morris
Read by Georgina Sutton
11 hours 09 minutes

The Pillow Book of Sei Shōnagon is a fascinating, detailed account of Japanese court life in the closing years of the 10th century. Written by a lady of the court at the height of Heian culture, this book enthralls with its lively gossip, witty observations, and subtle impressions. Continue Reading →

AION

AION

By C.G Jung
Read by David Rintoul
10 hours 46 minutes

 David Rintoul

Aion is one of the major works of C.G. Jung’s later years. The title comes from the Greek word for aeon or age and refers to the age of Christianity, for, in Aion, Jung is concerned with the collective psychic development that the Christian era represents. How did it come about when it did? What psychic change did it represent? In exploring these questions, Jung (1875-1961) draws upon Christian symbolism and, in particular, the figure of Christ as a case study in the archetype of the Self. Continue Reading →

THE PRINCIPAL SPEECHES OF DEMOSTHENES

THE PRINCIPAL SPEECHES OF DEMOSTHENES

By Demosthenes
Read by David Rintoul
7 hours 45 minutes

 David Rintoul

Demosthenes (384-322 BCE) is regarded as one of the greatest orators of Classical times. This view has persisted through the centuries even though his rousing speeches warning of the dangers of Macedonian expansion – firstly guided by Philip II and then Alexander the Great – failed to stem the course of continued military success. Continue Reading →

WHAT IS PROPERTY?

WHAT IS PROPERTY?

by PIERRE-JOSEPH PROUDHON

Read by James Gillies
11 hours 12 minutes

‘Property is Theft’, a phrase which has passed into common parlance, was the rallying call of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon’s political treatise What Is Property?Proudhon (1809-1865) was both admired and excoriated. A political theorist of the first order, he was vilified in his native France by the Communists and the Monarchists alike, though admired by Karl Marx as well as many in the nation’s academia and judiciary who valued the clarity of his thought and analytical method. Continue Reading →

A BRIEF HISTORY OF 20TH CENTURY WESTERN PHILOSOPHY

A BRIEF HISTORY OF 20TH CENTURY WESTERN PHILOSOPHY

by Garrett Thomson

Read by James Gillies
11 hours 12 minutes

During the 20th century, our understanding of the world was transformed thanks to the likes of relativity, quantum physics, molecular biology, chaos theory and computer science. Likewise, our comprehension of ourselves developed dramatically courtesy of theories such as behaviourism, structuralism and cognitive science. Continue Reading →

WHAT IS METAPHYSICS, WHAT IS PHILOSOPHY AND OTHER WRITINGS

WHAT IS METAPHYSICS, WHAT IS PHILOSOPHY AND OTHER WRITINGS

By Martin Heidegger
Read by Martyn Swain
4 hours 24 minutes

This recording contains four important and related works by Heidegger: ‘What is Philosophy’, ‘What is Metaphysics’, ‘On the Essence of Truth’ and ‘The Question of Being’. It starts with ‘What is Philosophy’ which originated as a lecture given in Normandy in 1955, and was first published a year later. Continue Reading →

THE NEUROTIC CHARACTER

THE NEUROTIC CHARACTER

By Alfred Adler
Read by Leighton Pugh
14 hours 13 minutes

As the 20th century drew to a close, the Austrian psychologist Alfred Adler (1870-1937) was perhaps the least known of the prominent figures of his time – in particular Sigmund Freud and Carl Gustav Jung – and yet he continues to be a figure of influence in the 21st century. His school of ‘individual psychology’ involved a holistic approach to the study of the individual, with a key focus on the way each person viewed the world, especially regarding their concerns of inferiority. Continue Reading →

SUMMA THEOLOGICA VOLUME 5

SUMMA THEOLOGICA VOLUME 5 SUPPLEMENT TO PART III


By Thomas Aquinas

Read by Martyn Swain
39 hours 8 minutes

Thomas Aquinas (c1225-1274) died before he could complete his ambitious plan for Summa Theologica, described as ‘a systematic compendium’ of Roman Catholic theology. Drawing on a wide range of Christian sources – and, controversially, on Greek and Latin philosophers as well as Arabian commentators – he sought to explicate matters of doctrine through a specific scheme of Question, Article, Objection, Answer and Reply. Continue Reading →

WAGNER’S ‘RING’ AND ITS SYMBOLS

WAGNER’S ‘RING’ AND ITS SYMBOLS

The Myth and the Music With 200 music examples

By Robert Donington
Read by Michael Lunts
13 hours 33 minutes

Michael Lunts

‘This enthralling book is an examination – deep analysis might be the word – of Wagner and his great work in terms not of politics or merely musical values, but in those of the depth psychology which it is simplest to call “post-Jungian”. In a short review, one can hardly do justice to the patience and thoroughness of Professor Donington’s analysis, not only of the principal characters but of the enormous structure of symbol, irony and illusion drawn from the primordial myths, and relating it to the music which is so powerful and direct a language. Continue Reading →

ON HEROES, HERO-WORSHIP and THE HEROIC IN HISTORY

ON HEROES, HERO-WORSHIP and THE HEROIC IN HISTORY

by Thomas Carlyle

Read by James Gillies
11 hours 16 minutes

Though conflicted, polemical and argumentative, Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) made a lasting impact on 19th century culture as a multi-talented man of letters. And though his lengthy history of the French Revolution proved his major scholarly legacy, On Heroes, Hero-Worship and The Heroic in History remains perhaps his most popular and accessible work. It presented his deep-seated belief that ‘Universal History, the history of what man has accomplished in this world, is at bottom the History of the Great Men who have worked here.’ Continue Reading →

SARTOR RESARTUS

SARTOR RESARTUS

by Thomas Carlyle

Read by James Gillies
10 hours 40 minutes

Sartor Resartus is one of the most unusual, even quirky, British novels, to emerge from the first half of the 19th century. Published in 1836, its varied heritage reflects the earlier eccentricities of Sterne and Swift, curiously mixed with influences from Goethe. Continue Reading →

STUDIES IN THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SEX VOLUME 1

STUDIES IN THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SEX VOLUME 1

The Evolution of Modesty • The Phenomena of Sexual Periodicity • Auto-Erotism
By Havelock Ellis
Read by Charles Armstrong
12 hours 42 minutes

Havelock Ellis (1859-1939) was a pioneering figure in modern sexual studies. In the early years of the 20th century, through his seven volumes of Studies in the Psychology of Sex, he paved the way for a more scientific and less judgemental attitude towards the subject, unhampered by the restrictions of religious or moral conventions. Ellis (simultaneously with Sigmund Freud) helped Western society to consider sexual behaviour, in all its many forms, with fresh eyes. Continue Reading →

STUDIES IN THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SEX VOLUME 2

STUDIES IN THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SEX VOLUME 2

Sexual Inversion – Homosexuality
By Havelock Ellis
Read by Charles Armstrong
16 hours 29 minutes

The seven volumes of Studies in the Psychology of Sex by Havelock Ellis (1859-1939) which appeared between 1900 and 1928 were each a landmark in the more open considerations of sexual impulse in the Western world. And none more so than Volume 2 which appeared in 1900. It examined homosexuality, though Ellis more frequently used the term ‘sexual inversion’ which, at the time, had broader (but not derogatory) implications. Continue Reading →

AN INQUIRY INTO THE HUMAN MIND: ON THE PRINCIPLES OF COMMON SENSE

AN INQUIRY INTO THE HUMAN MIND: ON THE PRINCIPLES OF COMMON SENSE

by Thomas Reid

Read by James Gillies
11 hours 58 minutes

Though now little known outside specialist philosophical circles, the Scottish philosopher Thomas Reid (1710-1796) is remembered both for the founding of the Scottish School of Common Sense and his major work, An Inquiry into the Human Mind:on the Principles of Common Sense (1764). With his feet firmly on the ground, he challenged the speculative ideas of David Hume and George Berkeley who regarded ideas in the mind as a basis for the external world. Continue Reading →

THE REVOLUTION BETRAYED

THE REVOLUTION BETRAYED

What is the Soviet Union and where is it going?

By Leon Trotsky
Read by Jonathan Booth
tbc minutes

 

It is June 1936. Leon Trotsky (1879-1940) has finally been granted a visa for asylum in Norway, having been banned first from living in Paris, and then the whole of France.  With him comes the draft of The Revolution Betrayed: What is the Soviet Union and where is it going?, which is completed and sent to the publishers on the 4th of August. Continue Reading →