Tag Archives | Jonathan Keeble

THE ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE PEACE

THE ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE PEACE
by John Maynard Keynes • Read by Jonathan Keeble
The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1919) was one of the most important documents to come out of World War 1 – specifically the period of the Armistice and the subsequent settlement negotiations. And, a century on, it remains of particular relevance to our times – an uncompromising and forthright analysis of how international diplomacy can be suffused by personalities, prejudices, personal ambition and outright, uncontrolled feelings of revenge.

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THE GENERAL THEORY OF EMPLOYMENT, INTEREST, AND MONEY

THE GENERAL THEORY OF EMPLOYMENT, INTEREST, AND MONEY
by John Maynard Keynes • Read by Jonathan Keeble
Keynes’ The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money remains, approaching a century after it first appeared, one of the most important documents on economics, along with Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations and Karl Marx’s Capital. Hugely important for much of the 20th century, the General Theory was seemingly overtaken by monetarists but won a new, enduring respect among a new generation of economists and politicians following the financial difficulties which began in 2007/8.

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JASON AND THE GOLDEN FLEECE

JASON AND THE GOLDEN FLEECE
By Apollonius of Rhodes • Read by Jonathan Keeble
Jason and the Golden Fleece is one of the finest tales of Ancient Greece, an epic journey of adventure and trial standing beside similar stories of Perseus, Theseus and the Labours of Heracles. The finest classic account comes from Apollonius of Rhodes, the Greek poet of the 3rd century BCE and librarian at Alexandria.

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THE GOLDEN ASS

THE GOLDEN ASS

THE GOLDEN ASS

Or Metamorphoses

By Apuleius • Read by Jonathan Keeble
This tale of a man who, when tinkering with magic, becomes changed into an ass is one of the most entertaining and remarkable stories from classic Latin literature. It is funny, bawdy, completely approachable – but also shows life from the point of view of a beast of burden in the Roman empire of Second Century CE.

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