Archive | Catalogue

JASON AND THE GOLDEN FLEECE

JASON AND THE GOLDEN FLEECE

By Apollonius of Rhodes
Read by Jonathan Keeble
6 hours 17 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

Jason and the Golden Fleece is one of the finest tales of Ancient Greece, an epic journey of adventure and trial standing beside similar stories of Perseus, Theseus and the Labours of Heracles. The finest classic account comes from Apollonius of Rhodes, the Greek poet of the 3rd century BCE and librarian at Alexandria. Continue Reading →

BEWARE OF PITY

BEWARE OF PITY

By Stefan Zweig
Read by Nicholas Boulton
14 hours 42 minutes

In the twilight of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, a young cavalry officer is invited to a dance at the home of a rich landowner. There – with a small act of attempted charity – he commits a simple faux pas. But from this seemingly insignificant blunder comes a tale of catastrophe arising from kindness, and of honour poisoned by self-regard. Beware of Pity has all the intensity and the formidable sense of torment and of character, of the very best of Zweig’s work. Sensitively read by Nicholas Boulton. Continue Reading →

CONUNDRUM

CONUNDRUM

By Jan Morris
Read by Roy McMillan
5 hours 12 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

This remarkable memoir is the classic account of the transgender journey. It is all the more extraordinary because it is the life story of a figure who, it seemed, seamlessly, and publicly charted a course through the English establishment – James Morris, outstanding journalist, historian and travel writer, famed for a peerless writing style. But all the while he was concealing a very different inner world: from the age of four he felt that, despite his body, he was really a girl. Continue Reading →

DIARY OF A PROVINCIAL LADY

diary-of-a-provincial-ladyDIARY OF A PROVINCIAL LADY

By E. M. Delafield
Read by Georgina Sutton
5 hours 22 minutes

georgina-sutton

‘Lady B. stays to tea. (Mem.: Bread-and-butter too thick. Speak to Ethel.) We talk some more about bulbs, the Dutch School of Painting, our Vicar’s wife, sciatica, and All Quiet on the Western Front. (Query: Is it possible to cultivate the art of conversation when living in the country all the year round?)’ If the question suggests a qualified answer, there is no doubt that the art of diary writing is alive and well and very, very funny in Devonshire in the 1920s. Continue Reading →

THE PROVINCIAL LADY GOES FURTHER

THE PROVINCIAL LADY GOES FURTHER

By E. M. Delafield
Read by Georgina Sutton
5 hours 55 minutes

 

The Provincial Lady Goes Further is the immediate sequel to Diary of a Provincial Lady – and life mirrors art. Our Provincial Lady has found herself, unexpectedly, with a literary success on her hands! She is, suddenly, ‘Somebody,’ both in her Devonshire environs and in London where she establishes a bolthole – ostensibly so she could concentrate on the much-awaited sequel, but also so that she can enjoy the fruits of being a best-selling author! Continue Reading →

THE WORLD OF YESTERDAY

THE WORLD OF YESTERDAY

By Stefan Zweig
Read by David Horovitch
17 hours 50 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

Stefan Zweig’s memoir The World of Yesterday, recalls the golden age of pre-war Europe – its seeming permanence, its promise and its devastating fall with the onset of two world wars. Zweig’s passionate, evocative prose paints a stunning portrait of an era that danced brilliantly on the brink of extinction. Continue Reading →

THE INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS

THE INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS

By Sigmund Freud
Read by Derek Le Page
25 hours 49 minutes

The Interpretation of Dreams by Sigmund Freud is one of the most significant books of the 20th century. Though dreams and their role in human consciousness have been a continuing thread in religion and art and life down the centuries, Freud’s look at the subject through the prism of his emerging practice and study of psychoanalysis provided a startlingly new and challenging perspective. Continue Reading →

POETICS • RHETORIC

POETICS • RHETORIC

By Aristotle
Read by James Cameron Stewart
10 hours 37 minutes

Poetics and Rhetoric are the two major works by Aristotle which, after more than 2,000 years, remain key behavioural handbooks for anyone interested in story, performance, presentation and indeed psychology. The continuing influence of Poetics, for example, is readily discernible even among the scriptwriters of Hollywood! Continue Reading →

METAPHYSICS

METAPHYSICS

By Aristotle
Read by James Cameron Stewart
14 hours 30 minutes

Aristotle’s Metaphysics was the first major study of the subject of metaphysics – in other words, an inquiry into ‘first philosophy’, or ‘wisdom’. It differs from ‘Physics’ which is concerned with the natural world: things which are subject to the laws of nature, things that move and change, are measurable. Continue Reading →

THREE ESSAYS ON THE THEORY OF SEXUALITY, BEYOND THE PLEASURE PRINCIPLE, THE EGO AND THE ID

THREE ESSAYS ON THE THEORY OF SEXUALITY, BEYOND THE PLEASURE PRINCIPLE, THE EGO AND THE ID

By Sigmund Freud
Read by Derek Le Page
8 hours 52 minutes

Here are three key works by Sigmund Freud which, published in the first decades of the 20th century, underpinned his developing views and had such a dramatic effect on world society. In the uncompromising Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905) he declared that ‘sexual aberrations’ are not limited to the insane but exist in ‘normal’ people to a greater or lesser degree. Continue Reading →

THE MABINOGION

THE MABINOGION

translated by Charlotte Guest
Read Richard Mitchley
10 hours 12 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

The Mabinogion, the earliest literary jewel of Wales, is a collection of ancient tales and legends compiled around the 12th and 13th century deriving from storytelling and the songs of bards handed down over the ages. It is a remarkable document in many ways. From an historical perspective, it is the earliest prose literature of Britain. Continue Reading →

HOW IT IS

How It Is

By Samuel Beckett
Read Dermot Crowley
5 hours 20 minutes

How It Is, a landmark in 20th century literature, is one of the most challenging of Samuel Beckett’s early novels. He published it first in French in 1961 and then in his own translation in 1964. He explained in a letter that it was the outpouring of a  “‘man’ lying panting in the mud and dark murmuring his ‘life’ as he hears it obscurely uttered by a voice inside him… Continue Reading →

AGAINST NATURE

AGAINST NATURE

By Joris-Karl Huysmans
Read Nicholas Boulton
7 hours 56 minutes

Against Nature (A Rebours) was one of the most shocking French novels of the 19th century. When it was published in 1884 it thrilled the aesthetes, the poets, and the intellectuals of Europe on both sides of the Channel, (notably Oscar Wilde) because for all its lofty tone, it had, as its core, an unbridled decadence; and it was just this same character that challenged, even horrified, established bourgeois society. Continue Reading →

WATT

 Watt

By Samuel Beckett
Read by Dermot Crowley
10 hours 5 minutes

Written in Roussillon during World War Two, while Samuel Beckett was hiding from the Gestapo, Watt was first published in 1953. Beckett acknowledged that this comic novel unlike any other ‘has its place in the series’ – those masterpieces running from Murphy to the Trilogy, Waiting for Godot and beyond. It shares their sense of a world in crisis, their profound awareness of the paradoxes of being, and their distrust of the rational universe.  Continue Reading →

THE PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF EVERYDAY LIFE

THE PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF EVERYDAY LIFE

By Sigmund Freud
Read by Derek Le Page
8 hours 6 minutes

The Psychopathology of Everyday Life, which appeared first in 1901 and was then expanded in a series of subsequent editions, has proved to be one of Freud’s most popular works, and one of his most influential during his lifetime. It was here that he proposed that many slips and errors of memory common to the average man in everyday life actually signals unconscious issues that beset the individual, and, if examined, can be extremely revealing. Continue Reading →

THE PRAISE OF FOLLY / AGAINST WAR

THE PRAISE OF FOLLY / AGAINST WAR

By Desiderius Erasmus
Read by Georgina Sutton, Leighton Pugh
6 hours

Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam (1466-1536) was known as Prince of the Humanists – though a theologian, a Catholic priest and the leading European scholar of his time. A close friend of Sir Thomas More, Erasmus’s writings had a strong influence on the growing movement for change in Christian Europe, both Lutheran and the Counter-Reformation. Continue Reading →

UTILITARIANISM • ON LIBERTY

utilitarianism-%e2%80%a2-on-liberty

UTILITARIANISM • ON LIBERTY

By John Stuart Mill
Read by Derek Le Page
8 hours 49 minutes

derek-le-page

John Stuart Mill (1808-1873) was a torch-bearer for liberal thought in the 19th century: liberty of the individual, freedom of speech, a champion for women’s suffrage in Parliament. A remarkable man – he learnt Greek aged three, and by eight had read Herodotus, Xenophon and Plato – he campaigned all his life for a just society. Continue Reading →

THE LETTERS OF PLINY THE YOUNGER

the-letters-of-pliny-the-youngerTHE LETTERS OF PLINY THE YOUNGER

By Pliny the Younger
Read by Leighton Pugh
12 hours 40 minutes

Leighton Pugh

Pliny the Younger (61 CE -c113 CE) was a well-connected official in the Rome of the 1st century, and it is through his ten Books of letters that we have one of the liveliest and most informal pictures of the period. As a lawyer and magistrate he rose through the senate to become consul in 100 AD, and therefore corresponded with leading figures including the historian Tacitus, the biographer Suetonius, the philosophers Artemidorus and Euphrates the Stoic and most notably the Emperor Trajan. Continue Reading →

LAND OF MEN

land-of-menLAND OF MEN (Wind Sand and Stars)

By Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Read by Nicholas Boulton
5 hours 18 minutes

boulton

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry is known universally for the gentle charm of Le Petit Prince, but it is this book, Land of Men – known originally in English as Wind, Sand and Stars – which is his masterpiece. First published in 1939, it documents Saint-Exupéry’s life as a pilot in the pioneering days of long-distance flying and in particular his experiences as a pilot transporting mail across countries, across continents. Continue Reading →

AGRICOLA, GERMANIA, A DIALOGUE CONCERNING ORATORY

agricola-germania-a-dialogue-concerning-oratory
AGRICOLA, GERMANIA, A DIALOGUE CONCERNING ORATORY

By Tacitus
Read by Leighton Pugh
4 hours 49 minutes

Leighton Pugh

These three vibrant texts show different sides of the Roman historian Tacitus (c56–c102 CE) best known for his principal (and much longer) legacies of  The Annals and The Histories. Agricola was a successful general and Governor of Britain (77-83CE), a task which he carried out with firmness and probity – in contrast to much of the corruption and repression in place during the reign of Emperor Domitian. Continue Reading →