Archive | Catalogue

THE GENERAL THEORY OF EMPLOYMENT, INTEREST, AND MONEY

THE GENERAL THEORY OF EMPLOYMENT, INTEREST, AND MONEY

By John Maynard Keynes
Read by Jonathan Keeble
14 hours 37 minutes

Keynes’ The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money remains, approaching a century after it first appeared, one of the most important documents on economics, along with Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations and Karl Marx’s Capital. Hugely important for much of the 20th century, the General Theory was seemingly overtaken by monetarists but won a new, enduring respect among a new generation of economists and politicians following the financial difficulties which began in 2007/8.  Continue Reading →

AN ESSAY CONCERNING HUMAN UNDERSTANDING

AN ESSAY CONCERNING HUMAN UNDERSTANDING

By John Locke
Read by Leighton Pugh
30 hours 20 minutes

John Locke and his works – particularly An Essay Concerning Human Understanding – are regularly and rightly presented as foundations for the Age of Enlightenment. His primary epistemological message – that the mind at birth is a blank sheet waiting to be filled by the experiences of the senses – complemented his primary political message: that human beings are free and equal and have the right to envision, create and direct the governments that rule them and the societies within which they live. Continue Reading →

ELEMENTS OF THE PHILOSOPHY OF RIGHT

ELEMENTS OF THE PHILOSOPHY OF RIGHT

By  Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
Read by Jonathan Booth
14 hours 11 minutes

Elements of The Philosophy of Right, a key work in the output of Georg Wilhelm Hegel (1770-1831), appeared in 1820 – and was arguably his last major publication. His intention was to state his views on the philosophy of law, political and social theory, and ethics. Continue Reading →

FORMATIVE EARLY WRITINGS

FORMATIVE EARLY WRITINGS

By Karl Marx
Read by Derek Le Page
12 hours 22 minutes

Though Karl Marx is best known for Capital and The Communist Manifesto, his revolutionary thoughts and ideas had developed over decades spent in study, discussion and association with a variety of organisations throughout Europe and the US, intent on challenging the establishment order. Continue Reading →

CAPITAL Volume 1

CAPITAL Volume 1

By Karl Marx
Read by Derek Le Page
43 hours 04 minutes

It can be said of very few books that the world was changed as a result of its publication – but this is certainly the case of Capital, Critique of Political Economy by Karl Marx (1818-1883). Volume 1 appeared (in German) in 1867, and the two subsequent volumes appeared at later dates after the author’s death Continue Reading →

CAPITAL Volume 2

CAPITAL Volume 2

By Karl Marx
Read by Derek Le Page
29 hours 34 minutes

It was the close friendship and professional association between Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels that enabled Marx’s full vision presented in Capital: A Critique of Political Economy to come to fruition. Following Marx’s death in 1883, Engels was able to step into the breach and, drawing on Marx’s extensive notes and writings, complete Volume 2 of Capital, leading to its publication in 1885. Here, Marx turns his attention to the money owner, the money lender, the wholesale merchant, the trader and the entrepreneur or ‘functioning capitalist. Continue Reading →

A THEOLOGICO-POLITICAL TREATISE

A THEOLOGICO-POLITICAL TREATISE

By BARUCH SPINOZA
Read by Leighton Pugh
16 hours 4 minutes

Though it first aroused anger and controversy rather than admiration and acceptance, A Theologico-Political Treatise was a landmark in the analysis of theology (with particular reference to the Bible and its Jewish and Christian interpretations) and its relationship to philosophy and politics. Spinoza’s scholarly analysis, based on careful study, demonstrated that the Bible was composed by many writers over the centuries  – and that even the Pentateuch, the first five books, were not the work of Moses as was generally assumed at the time. Continue Reading →

THE THIRTEEN PRINCIPAL UPANISHADS

THE THIRTEEN PRINCIPAL UPANISHADS

By Anonymous
Read by SAGAR ARYA
11 hours 11 minutes

The Upanishads are mankind’s oldest works of philosophy, predating the earliest Greek philosophy. They are the concluding part of the Vedas, the ancient Indian sacred literature, and mark the culmination of a tradition of speculative thought first expressed in the Rig-Veda more than 4000 years ago. Continue Reading →

DAPHNIS AND CHLOE

DAPHNIS AND CHLOE

By LONGUS
Read by Nicholas Boulton
2 hours 47 minutes

Daphnis and Chloe is one of the most engaging and gently erotic stories to emerge from the ancient worlds of Greece and Rome. It is a pastoral tale, telling of a boy and a girl, both abandoned (but separately) as babies on nearby hillsides; one becomes a goatherd, the other a shepherdess and a mutual attraction arises as they move from childhood to adolescence and to the slow discovery of desire. Will aggressive forces and rival suitors prevent a natural consummation and happy conclusion? Continue Reading →

CRITIQUE OF JUDGEMENT

CRITIQUE OF JUDGEMENT

By Immanuel KANT
Read by Michael Lunts
15 hours 10 minutes

Michael Lunts

Kant’s Critique of Judgement is the third and final part of his series of Critiques, which began with Critique of Pure Reason and continued with Critique of Practical Reason. Continue Reading →

CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON

CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON

By Immanuel KANT
Read by Michael Lunts
7 hours 6 minutes

Michael Lunts

The Critique of Practical Reason was published in 1788, seven years after his major work, Critique of Pure Reason. In it, Kant sets out his moral philosophy – and it proved a seminal text in the history of the subject. Continue Reading →

THE SECRET HISTORY

THE SECRET HISTORY

By Procopius
Read by James Cameron Stewart
5 hours 2 minutes

The Secret History, written by the 6th century Byzantine historian Procopius is one of the most extraordinary and scandalous documents to have survived from the early Byzantine period. Procopius, the leading official historian of his time, lived during the testing and indulgent time of Emperor Justinian the Great and wrote the official records of the successful wars and the grand building projects of his ruler. Continue Reading →

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – EARLY PERIOD VOLUME 1

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – EARLY PERIOD VOLUME 1

The Apology • Crito • Charmenides • Laches • Lysis • Euthyphro • Menexenus • Ion

By Plato
Multi-Voice Production – Read by David Rintoul as Socrates and cast
6 hours 32 minutes

Here are the Socratic Dialogues presented as Plato designed them to be – living discussions between friends and protagonists, with the personality of Socrates himself coming alive as he deals with a host of subjects, from justice and inspiration to courage, poetry and the gods. Continue Reading →

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – EARLY PERIOD VOLUME 2

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – EARLY PERIOD VOLUME 2

Gorgias • Protagoras • Meno • Euthydemus • Lesser Hippias • Greater Hippias

By Plato
Multi-Voice Production – Read by David Rintoul as Socrates and cast
10 hours 9 minutes

Here, in this second collection of Socratic Dialogues from Plato’s Early Period, read by David Rintoul as Socrates with a full cast, are contrasting six works. Often, as with Gorgias, which opens the recording, Socrates combats the popular subjects of sophistry and rhetoric, in direct conversation with Gorgias (a leading spophist teacher), and with one of his pupils, Callicles. In Meno, Socrates encounters another Gorgias pupil, Meno and a debate on ‘virtue’ ensues. Continue Reading →

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – MIDDLE PERIOD VOLUME 1

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – MIDDLE PERIOD VOLUME 1

Symposium • Theaetetus • Phaedo

By Plato
Multi-Voice Production – Read by David Rintoul as Socrates, Hugh Ross (Symposium) and cast
8 hours 30 minutes

Here are three important but very different Dialogues from the Middle Period. SYMPOSIUM, the most well-known in this collection, is concerned with the theme of love. In the house of Agathon, a group of friends – each very different in personality and background – meet to consider and discuss various kinds of love. Continue Reading →

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – MIDDLE PERIOD VOLUME 2

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – MIDDLE PERIOD VOLUME 2

Phaedrus • Cratylus • Parmenides

By Plato
Multi-Voice Production – Read by David Rintoul as Socrates, Laurence Kennedy (Parmenides) and cast
6 hours 53 minutes

The remarkable range of Plato’s Socratic Dialogues is vividly demonstrated by these three works. It opens with Phaedrus, a highly personal discussion between Socrates (David Rintoul) and the young, love-struck Phaedrus (Gunnar Cauthery). Continue Reading →

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – MIDDLE PERIOD VOLUME 3

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – MIDDLE PERIOD VOLUME 3

The Republic

By Plato
Read by David Rintoul as Socrates
12 hours

The Republic is perhaps the single most important, the most studied and the most quoted text of all Plato’s Socratic Dialogues. Through the medium of Socrates, Plato outlines his view and ideas concerning the ideal working of the city state.  Continue Reading →

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – LATE PERIOD VOLUME 1

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – LATE PERIOD VOLUME 1

Timaeus • Sophist • Critias • Statesman • Philebus

By Plato
Multi-Voice Production – David Rintoul as Socrates, with David Timson, Peter Kenny and full cast
10 hours 41 mins

These five very different Socratic Dialogues date from Plato’s later period when he was revisiting his early thoughts and conclusions and showing a willingness for revision. In Timaeus  (mainly a monologue read by David Timson in the title role) Plato considers cosmology in terms of the nature and structure of the universe, the ever-changing physical world and the unchanging eternal world. And he proposes a demiurge as a benevolent creator God. Continue Reading →

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – LATE PERIOD VOLUME 2

THE SOCRATIC DIALOGUES – LATE PERIOD VOLUME 2

The Laws

By Plato
Read by Laurence Kennedy with Hayward Morse and Sam Dale

The Laws is the longest of Plato’s Dialogues and actually doesn’t feature Socrates at all – the principal figure taking the lead is the ‘Athenian Stranger’ who engages two older men in the discussion, Cleinias (from Crete) and Megillus (from Sparta). Continue Reading →

ON THE SOUL AND PARVA NATURALIA

ON THE SOUL AND PARVA NATURALIA

By Aristotle
Read by James Cameron Stewart
8 hours 55 minutes

Two contrasting reflections by Aristotle which cover a very particular ground. In On the Soul, Aristotle presents his view of the ‘life essence’ which, he argues, is possessed by living things whether plants, animals or humans. Not a ‘soul’ in the generally accepted Western use of the term, this ‘soul’ he says is a life force that is indivisible from the organism that possesses it. Continue Reading →