Archive | Catalogue

BETWEEN THE ACTS

BETWEEN THE ACTS

By Virginia Woolf
Read by Georgina Sutton
5 hours 42 minutes

Between The Acts, Virginia Woolf’s last novel, was finished in November 1940 and shortly afterwards delivered to her publisher Hogarth Press. The following March she committed suicide. Between the Acts is often an overlooked work in her oeuvre because she did express her intention to revise it before publication, though in the event this never happened. So it comes as a surprise to find that, while it probably would have benefitted from revision, it is something of an unpolished gem, at times sparkling and actually very engaging. Continue Reading →

COLLECTED PAPERS ON ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY

COLLECTED PAPERS ON ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY

By C.G Jung
Read by Martyn Swain
17 hours 49 minutes

Collected Papers on Analytical Psychology comprises a selection of key writings and lectures by Carl Gustav Jung produced between 1902 and 1916, which are presented in chronological order. As such they provide a fascinating exposition of the nature and essence of the psychological content of psychoses and neuroses, as explored and discovered by Dr Jung in the early years of his long and distinguished career. Continue Reading →

MODERN MAN IN SEARCH OF A SOUL

MODERN MAN IN SEARCH OF A SOUL

By C.G Jung
Read by Martyn Swain
9 hours 11 minutes


This collection of eleven wide-ranging lectures which appeared originally in 1933, was based on lectures previously given when Jung was in the process of absorbing a considerable period of study of Eastern religions, Gnosticism and other religious sources. It was a time, according to the translator Cary F. Baynes, ‘when the Western world stands on the verge of a spiritual rebirth… Continue Reading →

THE ANATOMY OF MELANCHOLY

THE ANATOMY OF MELANCHOLY

By Robert Burton
Read by Peter Wickham
56 hours 49 minutes

The Anatomy of Melancholy is one of the most remarkable books ever written. First published in 1621, and hardly ever out of print since, it is a huge, varied, idiosyncratic, entertaining and learned survey of the experience of melancholy, seen from just about every possible angle that could be imagined. Its subtitle explains much: Continue Reading →

THE COMMON READER VOLUME 1

THE COMMON READER VOLUME 1

26 Essays

By Virginia Woolf
Read by Joan Walker
8 hours 41 minutes

This is Virginia Woolf’s first collection of essays, published in 1925. In them, she attempts to see literature from the point of view of the ‘common reader’ – someone whom she, with Dr Johnson, distinguished from the critic and the scholar. She read, and wrote, as an outsider: a woman set to school in her father’s library, denied the educational privileges of her male siblings – and with no fixed view of what constitutes ‘English literature’. Continue Reading →

THE GOLDEN BOUGH

THE GOLDEN BOUGH

A Study in Magic and Religion

By James George Frazer
Read by Andrew Cullum
44 hours 16 minutes

The Golden Bough, the monumental study of religious rites and practices in ‘primitive’ societies, was one of the earliest influential texts in anthropology. Its author, Sir James Frazer, surveyed the wide range of cultural habits, taboos and beliefs in communities across the world concluding that there was an observable pattern in the way magic developed into religion, though formal expression emerged in different ways. It was a study that he continued for many years, with initial volumes appearing in 1890 and growing in size until the 12-volume edition was published in 1915. Continue Reading →

OBLOMOV

OBLOMOV

By Ivan Goncharov
Read by Leighton Pugh
20 hours 07 minutes

Oblomov is one of the most distinctive characters in Russian literature – within a short time following its publication in 1859, the novel spawned its own saying: ‘Oblomovism’! From the pen of Ivan Goncharov (1812-1891) emerged a portrait of a young man, Ilya Ilyitch Oblomov who represented a figure well known in pre-revolutionary Russia at the time – one of the idle rich. Continue Reading →

BEING AND TIME

BEING AND TIME

By Martin Heidegger
Read by Martyn Swain With Introduction by Professor Taylor Carman
23 hours 18 minutes

In his lucid introduction to this recording, Professor Taylor Carman declares unequivocally that Being and Time by Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) is ‘one of the great masterpieces of 20th century philosophy.’ And that is despite the fact that it is unquestionably a challenging read. Continue Reading →

AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL STUDY AND THE FUTURE OF AN ILLUSION

AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL STUDY AND THE FUTURE OF AN ILLUSION

By Sigmund Freud
Read by Derek Le Page
5 hours 1 minutes

Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) reveals himself, in this autobiography which is simultaneously an account of the early history of psychoanalysis, to have been an outsider from the start. This fascinating account describes the journey of a young, Jewish doctor setting out to find his way in the world of professional medicine, his relationships and collaborations, friendships made and lost and his investigations into cocaine, hypnosis and the cathartic method which contributed to the evolution of his conceptual framework and practices. Continue Reading →

PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPES

PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPES

By C.G Jung
Read by Martyn Swain
24 hours 03 minutes

In the 21st century, Carl Gustav Jung  (1875-1961) remains one of the key figures in the field of analytical psychology  – and ‘Psychological Types’, or The Psychology of Individuation, published in 1921, is one of his most influential works. It was written during the decade after  the publication of Psychology of the Unconscious (1912)  which effectively ended his friendship and collaboration with Sigmund Freud. Continue Reading →

THE CONDITION OF THE WORKING CLASS IN ENGLAND IN 1844

THE CONDITION OF THE WORKING CLASS IN ENGLAND IN 1844

By Friedrich Engels
Read by Derek Le Page
14 hours 45 minutes

This remarkable account has had an enduring influence on social and economic studies, and has remained in print since its first English publication in 1885. It was written, in German, by a youthful Friedrich Engels, the son of a German industrialist, who was already concerned – even angered – by the conditions he saw inflicted on the working classes as the Industrial Revolution gathered momentum. Continue Reading →

THE DAWN OF DAY Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality

THE DAWN OF DAY

Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality

By Friedrich Nietzsche
Read by Michael Lunts
11 hours 29 minutes

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) is one of the towering intellectual figures of the nineteenth century, a philologist, philosopher and poet of profound complexity and range whose writings in moral philosophy continue to resonate in the present day. ‘The Dawn of Day’, (Morgenröte) first published in 1881 marked a clear shift in his thinking and prefigures many of the ideas that would be further developed in his later writings. Continue Reading →

THE ESSAYS Or Counsels, Civil and Moral

THE ESSAYS

Or Counsels, Civil and Moral
By Francis Bacon
Read by Hayward B. Morse
7 hours 38 minutes

Hayward B. Morse

Francis Bacon (1561-1626), Ist Viscount St Albans, Attorney General and then Lord Chancellor of England was an immensely learned, clever and ambitious man, with considerable political influence during the later years of Queen Elizabeth I and through almost two decades of the reign of her successor James I. However, he was also a philosopher with a wide interest in science, medicine and the classification of knowledge. Continue Reading →

THE RĀMĀYANA OF VALMIKI

THE RĀMĀYANA OF VALMIKI

By Anonymous
Read by SAGAR ARYA
43 hours 30 minutes

The ancient Indian Sanskrit epic, the Rāmāyana, was composed some time between the 1st and 5th centuries BCE. As is the case with most ancient literature firmly rooted in the oral tradition, precise dating is problematic. Traditionally attributed to the sage Valmīki, and composed in rhyming couplets, it is one of the two great Indian epics (the other being the Mahābhārata); consequently it is known and revered not just throughout the Indian subcontinent, but also in South-East Asian countries as well, including Cambodia, Thailand Malaysia and Indonesia – indeed wherever Hindu culture became established. Continue Reading →

TWO TREATISES OF GOVERNMENT A LETTER CONCERNING TOLERATION

TWO TREATISES OF GOVERNMENT

A LETTER CONCERNING TOLERATION

By John Locke
Read by Leighton Pugh
12 hours 50 minutes

John Locke (1632-1704) was a product of his troubled times: he lived through the English Civil War, the Interregnum, the Restoration, Monmouth’s Rebellion, the Bloody Assizes and the Glorious Revolution. His empirical thinking was very much directed at finding rational solutions to the root causes of those troubles. Considered the founder of English empiricism and a precursor of the enlightenment his ideas on religious toleration, human rights and limitations on governmental power may seem so normal to us now as to be common sense, so well have they been assimilated by the social psyche; but this was far from being the case when Locke proposed them. Continue Reading →

MORALIA VOLUME 1 26 Ethical Essays

MORALIA VOLUME 1

By Plutarch
Read by Matthew Lloyd Davies
15 hours 01 minutes

Though best known now for his collection of lively and vivid Parallel Lives from ancient Greece and Rome, Plutarch (c46 C.D – 120 C.E)  was, for centuries, more respected for his Moralia, a remarkable and wide-ranging collection of essays and speeches. Continue Reading →

THE LAY OF THE NIBELUNGS

THE LAY OF THE NIBELUNGS

Verse Translation by Alice Horton
Read by David Rintoul
11 hours 07 minutes

One of the finest German medieval epic poems, The Lay of the Nibelungs is perhaps best known now as one of the principal sources for Wagner’s four-part music drama, The Ring of the Nibelung. It is easy to see how Wagner was enthralled by the story and the poetry for the power of the tale drives the narrative: intense love, loyalty, jealousy, murder, duty, honour and massacre are all interwoven in a page-turner of a classic. Continue Reading →

MENGZI

MENGZI

With Selections from Traditional Commentaries

Translated and Read by Bryan W. Van Norden
9 hours 23 minutes

 

The Mengzi is one of the very greatest works of world literature and philosophy, and it is perhaps the single most influential Confucian text of all time.  Of all the Confucian classics, it is also the one most likely to speak to contemporary readers.  The Mengzi contains the dialogues, debates, and sayings of Mengzi, a Confucian sage of the fourth century BCE.  (He is also known by the Latinization of his name, “Mencius.”).  Continue Reading →

THE ANNALS

THE ANNALS

By Tacitus
Read by Martyn Swain
17 hours 1 minute

The Annals, written by Gaius Cornelius Tacitus (56c-120 CE) is regarded as one of the great literary works of history in the Roman world. Considered by many to be the greatest of Roman historians The Annals is Tacitus’s outstanding achievement. Originally comprising eighteen volumes, books seven to ten and parts of books five, six, eleven and sixteen have been lost but those that remain, read here by Martyn Swain, tell the fascinating tale of the Julio Claudian emperors and their times. Continue Reading →

DISCOURSE ON METAPHYSICS ON THE ULTIMATE ORIGIN OF THINGS

DISCOURSE ON METAPHYSICS ON THE ULTIMATE ORIGIN OF THINGS

By Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
Read by Charles Armstrong
5 hours 15 minutes

This Leibniz collection contains some of the philosopher’s most important works and ideas, spans three decades and illuminates the fascinating intellectual journey undertaken by him in his quest for truth. A prodigious polymath, Leibniz was a mathematician, philosopher, physicist and statesman and engaged with a sweeping range of ideas and disciplines, striving throughout his life to be at the cutting edge of scientific thinking. These Principal Essays are arranged in chronological order. Continue Reading →