Archive | Catalogue

THE WILL TO POWER

THE WILL TO POWER

By Friedrich Nietzsche
Read by Michael Lunts
23 hours 23 minutes

Nietzsche never recovered from his breakdown in 1889 and therefore was unable to further any plans he had for the ‘magnum opus’ he had once intended, bringing together in a coherent whole his mature philosophy. Continue Reading →

POLITICS

POLITICS

By Aristotle
Read by Andrew Cullum
10 hours 04 minutes

The title Politics literally means ‘the things concerning the city’. Here, Aristotle considers the important role that politics plays in the life of the community, and its contribution to harmonious and virtuous existence. Continue Reading →

SELECTIONS from PARERGA AND PARALIPOMENA VOLUME 2

SELECTIONS from PARERGA AND PARALIPOMENA VOLUME 2

By Arthur Schopenhauer
Read by Leighton Pugh
15 hours 58 minutes

Volume 2 of Parerga and Paralipomena has a very different character from Volume 1. There are, in total, 31 Essays, 24 of which are presented here. The range of topics is very varied, opening with On Philosophy and Its Method and including On Pantheism, On Ethics, On Jurisprudence, On Men of Learning, On Thinking for Oneself, On Religion and The Vanity of Existence. Continue Reading →

SELECTIONS from PARERGA AND PARALIPOMENA VOLUME 1

SELECTIONS from PARERGA AND PARALIPOMENA VOLUME 1

By Arthur Schopenhauer
Read by Leighton Pugh and David Rintoul
15 hours 58 minutes

 

The two sizeable volumes of Parerga and Paralipomena hold a special place in the output of Arthur Schopenhauer. Parerga means ‘supplementary to a main work, and Paralipomena suggests a further supplement but these two books were anything BUT a casual addition to his major opus, The World as Will and Idea. For a start, it was the publication of Parerga and Paralipomena in 1851 which brought Schopenhauer to the attention of the general public, decades after The World as Will and Idea first appeared. Continue Reading →

PHYSICS

PHYSICS

By Aristotle
Read by Peter Wickham
9 hours 54 minutes

No less a figure than Bertrand Russell remarked that Aristotle’s Physics was ‘extremely influential and dominated science until the time of Galileo’. This was despite the fact that this work is as much a collection of ‘lectures on nature’ rather than dealing with the science of physics as we understand the term. Aristotle considers ‘the principles and causes of change, or movement’ behind both animate and inanimate things.’ Continue Reading →

CAPITAL Volume 3

CAPITAL Volume 3

By Karl Marx
Read by Derek Le Page
50 hours 4 minutes

After the detailed history and workings of the development of capitalism in Capital Volumes I and 2, Marx set out, in Capital Volume 3 to consider the future of capitalism, its direction and its inevitable fall from a series of crises and faults intrinsic to the system itself. Published in 1894, 11 years after the death of Marx himself, Capital Volume 3 was the product of the untiring and meticulous work of Friedrich Engels working from Marx’s outline and notes and carried the subtitle The Process of Capitalist Production as a Whole. Continue Reading →

MUTUAL AID

MUTUAL AID

By Pyotr Kropotkin
Read by Peter Kenny
8 hours 24 minutes

PYOTR KROPOTKIN (1842-1921), one of the most individual political figures of his time, is best known as an influential anarchist communist. But he was also a scientist, geographer and philosopher, a man who, having grown up on his aristocratic father’s extensive country estate in Russia, had a deep understanding of, and love for, animals (wild and domesticated) the countryside and wildernesses. And all this was underpinned by a life committed to work for the good of humanity. Continue Reading →

APOLOGIA and MEMORABILIA

APOLOGIA and MEMORABILIA

By Xenophon
Read by David Rintoul
4 hours 41 mins

Xenophon was a friend of Socrates and yet his concise  memories of the iconic philosopher have lived under the shadow of the more voluminous accounts by Plato. Yet Xenophon’s two works – Apology and Memorabilia – are, in many ways, more entertaining and more accessible, and they present a different view of the man who embodies a clear mind, temperate, ethical living, sharp intellect and humour. Continue Reading →

THE PROVINCIAL LADY in WARTIME

THE PROVINCIAL LADY in WARTIME

with The Provincial Lady in Russia

By E. M. Delafield
Read by Georgina Sutton
8 hours 5 minutes

The Provincial Lady in Wartime, though the last of the Provincial Lady series, is one of the finest. No further ‘Diaries’ had appeared since The Provincial Lady in America (published in 1934) when, in 1939, Harold Macmillan, then chairman of Macmillan publishers and a fan, made a personal request to  E. M. Delafield for a new book. The onset of the war with Germany was serious but, he said, Britain, was in need of the entertaining but pertinent observations from The Provincial Lady! Continue Reading →

TWO FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEMS OF ETHICS ESSAY ON THE FREEDOM OF THE WILL / THE BASIS OF MORALITY

TWO FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEMS OF ETHICS ESSAY ON THE FREEDOM OF THE WILL / THE BASIS OF MORALITY

By Arthur Schopenhauer
Read by Leighton Pugh
20 hours 38 minutes

The essays in ‘The Two Fundamental Problems of Ethics’ have a rather special place in Schopenhauer’s work, both being written as entries to Scandinavian philosophy competitions, one in Norway and the other in Sweden. ‘Essay on the Freedom of the Will’ was Schopenhauer’s response to the question posed by the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences in 1839: ‘Is it possible to demonstrate human free will from self-consciousness’. Continue Reading →

UNTIMELY CONSIDERATIONS

UNTIMELY CONSIDERATIONS

By Friedrich Nietzsche
Read by Michael Lunts
• 12 hours 57 minutes

Michael Lunts

Untimely Considerations contain four essays: David Strauss – Writer and Confessor; On the Use and Abuse of History for Life; Schopenhauer as Educator; and Richard Wagner at Bayreuth. Continue Reading →

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA

By Geoffrey Chaucer
Read by Jonathan Keeble
7 hours 43 minutes

Considered one of Chaucer’s finest poems, second only to The Canterbury Tales in richness and depth, Troilus and Cressida is a tragic love story set against the background of the siege of Troy by the Greeks. Written in the 1380s, it presents Troilus, son of Priam and younger brother of Hector as a Trojan warrior of renown who sees, and falls deeply in love with the beautiful Cressida. Continue Reading →

THE CONQUEST OF BREAD

THE CONQUEST OF BREAD

By Pyotr Kropotkin
Read by Peter Kenny
7 hours 30 minutes

Pyotr Alexeyevich Kropotkin (1842-1921) was the leading – and the most widely admired – Anarchist Communist in the last decades of the 19th century and the first decades of the 20th. He lived long enough to see the establishment of Communism in Russia under Lenin who acknowledged Kropotkin’s commitment to political change. Continue Reading →

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND

By Georg Wilhelm Hegel
Read by Peter Wickham
7 hours 12 minutes

Philosophy of Mind is the third and final part of the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences, the collection in which Hegel (1730-1831) offered an overview of his life’s work. Though originally written in 1817, he revised it in 1830, thus providing a finished form the year before his death. Continue Reading →

ON THE PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL ECONOMY AND TAXATION

ON THE PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL ECONOMY AND TAXATION

By David Ricardo
Read by Matthew Lloyd Davies
13 hours 13 minutes

The works of the English political economist David Ricardo (1772-1823), and particularly his most important work, The Principles of Political Economy and Taxation, lie at the heart of the laissez-faire school of economics, preceded by Adam Smith and followed by John Stuart Mill. Economic growth, economic freedom – free trade rather than mercantilism, or controlled trade – was the fundamental attitude. Continue Reading →

ON THE FOURFOLD ROOT OF THE PRINCIPLE OF SUFFICIENT REASON

ON THE FOURFOLD ROOT OF THE PRINCIPLE OF SUFFICIENT REASON

By Arthur Schopenhauer
Read by Leighton Pugh
6 hours 45 minutes

There is a cause, or a reason, behind everything that happens. This is the fundamental view behind the classical proposition, ’The Principle of Sufficient Reason’, which, in 1813, Schopenhauer chose as his subject for further examination in his doctoral dissertation On the Fourfold Root of the Principle of Sufficient Reason. Continue Reading →

NICOMACHEAN ETHICS AND EUDEMIAN ETHICS

NICOMACHEAN ETHICS AND EUDEMIAN ETHICS

By Aristotle
Read by Andrew Cullum
14 hours 42 minutes

Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Eudemian Ethics represent, in many ways, the Western classical springboard for the systematic study and implementation of ethics, the optimum behaviour of the individual. (By contrast, Aristotle’s Politics concerns the optimum blueprint for the city-state). Continue Reading →

MORALIA VOLUME 1 26 Ethical Essays

MORALIA VOLUME 1

By Plutarch
Read by Matthew Lloyd Davies
15 hours 01 minutes

Though best known now for his collection of lively and vivid Parallel Lives from ancient Greece and Rome, Plutarch (c46 C.D – 120 C.E)  was, for centuries, more respected for his Moralia, a remarkable and wide-ranging collection of essays and speeches. Continue Reading →

ORGANON

ORGANON

By Aristotle
Read by Peter Noble
22 hours 45 minutes

Aristotle’s Organon comprises six key essays on logic, initially collected by Theophrastus, his successor as head of the Peripatetic school, and given its final form by Andronicus, some three centuries later. Continue Reading →

THE ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE PEACE

THE ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE PEACE

By John Maynard Keynes
Read by Jonathan Keeble
8 hours 17 minutes

The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1919) was one of the most important documents to come out of World War 1 – specifically the period of the Armistice and the subsequent settlement negotiations. And, a century on, it remains of particular relevance to our times – an uncompromising and forthright analysis of how international diplomacy can be suffused by personalities, prejudices, personal ambition and outright, uncontrolled feelings of revenge. Continue Reading →